6
A LAGUNA: AN EXPERIMENT IN COLLECTIVE FARMING

THE ROAD TO TORREON BEGINS IN THE LOWLANDS OF MONTERREY; shaggy gray cliffs tower over the valley, and the green of the trees outlined against them is intensified by rapid swirls of light and shadow as the sun shifts its course throughout the day. Wild flowers grow abundantly here, starlike blues and whites, sown by fall winds to blossom throughout the year. There is ripe color in the valley, and even the summer air holds moisture and sweetness. Only a few miles out, however, the road suddenly straightens as a string is pulled taut; the fields give way to desert flatness, the wild flowers to hunched little bushes and stubble. Even the cacti grow feebly here, and seem to cling to the and soil as though parched. Three hours one travels over desert land, if the car is exceptionally swift; much longer by bus. The intense heat gradually forms a shimmering halo around the engine hood; the air thickens, mile by mile, with desert dust and gasoline fumes. There is not a tree, not a curve of mountain softness against the sky; merely miles of sand, lifeless, parched and seemingly abandoned forever.

-125-

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Mexico Reborn
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Passage to Mexico 1
  • 2 - Age-Old Markets And Modern Schools 28
  • 3 - Cardenas Campaigns For President 58
  • 4 - Labor's Challenge 80
  • 5 - Portrait of Santa Maria Tepeji 109
  • 6 - A Laguna: an Experiment In Collective Farming 125
  • 7 - Freedom for Mexican Women 148
  • 8 - Anarchy in Art 170
  • 9 - Oil -- Mexico's Magnet 198
  • 10 - 'Marxists' Versus Fascists 226
  • II - Presidential Parade: 1940 Version 256
  • 12 - Six Years in Mexico: A Summary 279
  • Index 307
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