12
SIX YEARS IN MEXICO: A SUMMARY

THERE IS NO REAL AND VALID REASON WHY I SHOULD NOT END this book with an account of the political campaign. After all, if I attempt to translate all that Mexico has meant to me in terms of sheer human experience, I shall probably fail most lamentably. Furthermore, I have always had an angry spot in my heart for those books that reduce social problems affecting millions of lives to an absurdly microscopic and personal scale. Somehow, no individual suffering seems profoundly important when viewed against the broad canvas of social transformation. By applying the same theory to our own lives, Nacho's and mine, I reach the conclusion that all the disappointments, the heartbreaks and mental anguish we have endured are without importance if by means of them we have contributed something concrete, although very tiny indeed, toward building a Mexico for the future.

Yet, sometimes it is only possible to explain an entire scene by segregating one fragment of it, as a pathologist extracts a minute portion of a tumor and analyzes it beneath a microscope that magnifies many times. Our six years in Mexico have a social

-279-

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Mexico Reborn
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • 1 - Passage to Mexico 1
  • 2 - Age-Old Markets And Modern Schools 28
  • 3 - Cardenas Campaigns For President 58
  • 4 - Labor's Challenge 80
  • 5 - Portrait of Santa Maria Tepeji 109
  • 6 - A Laguna: an Experiment In Collective Farming 125
  • 7 - Freedom for Mexican Women 148
  • 8 - Anarchy in Art 170
  • 9 - Oil -- Mexico's Magnet 198
  • 10 - 'Marxists' Versus Fascists 226
  • II - Presidential Parade: 1940 Version 256
  • 12 - Six Years in Mexico: A Summary 279
  • Index 307
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