Early Civilization: An Introduction to Anthropology

By Alexander A. Goldenweiser | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHIC GUIDE1

INTRODUCTION: MAN AND CIVILIZATION

A discussion of racial differences, physical and psychic, and of the part played by heredity and environment in the determination of physical types, will be found in Franz Boas' "Mind of Primitive Man" ( The Macmillan Co.), Chapters I, II, and III. Those who may be interested in the nature and difficulties of the anatomical and statistical work involved, are referred to R. B. Bean "A Racial Peculiarity in the Brain of the Negro" ( American Journal of Anatomy, Vol. IV, 1905). This should be supplemented by Fr. P. Mall's "Several Anatomical Characters of the Human Brain, etc." (ibid, Vol. IX) and by Carl Pearson "The Relationship of Intelligence to Size and Shape of Head to Other Physical and Mental Characters" ( Biometrika, Vol. V). The general nature of civilization is discussed by Boas in Chapters IV, V and VI of the same book; also by R. H. Lowie in the first four chapters of his "Culture and Ethnology" ( Douglas C. McMurtrie and Boni and Liveright). A good idea of what is meant by culture, especially among anthropologists, can also be secured from R. R. Marett "Anthropology" ( Home University Library), and his "Psychology and Folk-Lore" ( The Macmillan Co.), espe. cially chapters I, IV, V, and VI. What culture stands for in modern society is stated with great lucidity and force in James Harvey Robinson "The Mind in the Making" ( Harper and Bros.).

The principles of classical evolutionism are best studied in a number of concrete works. Herbert Spencer "Principles of Sociology" stands unique for closeness of argumentation and a wholly uncritical as well as sweeping utilization

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1
This guide is not meant to be either exhaustive or systematic. It comprises a limited number of references, with comments, to competent works covering the subjects discussed in the chapters of this book.

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