CHAPTER IV
SYSTEM OF DESIRES

We have thus far ascertained that the behavior of the moral agent is carried out against the background of definite physical and neural properties. It appears that these properties embody the only conditions under which consciousness as we know it can be developed. Or, to cite the instructive phrase of Professor Strong, these conditions enable us to explain "why the mind has a body." We may now proceed to examine the analytical factors involved in the conscious act.

Psychology has sometimes paused to justify the use of the word "activity." Can a process or state or situation be so characterized? Is not each of these, if not a dramatic description by the observer, at least nothing but a passive relation to a neighboring stimulus--in short, a reaction, not a positive act? In many common sympathetic reactions, is not the moral quality extremely ambiguous? Can the performance of one's duty to parents, for example, be more than the learned response repeated by habit and drilled into the mind by stern admonitions and liberal disciplinary measures? If that were true, would not the changes in the nervous system prove that we were dealing with causes of a strictly mechanical nature? Thus, the stimulus impinges on the end-organs, whether kinæsthetic or auditory, and by passage through the series of neurones and synapses ultimately elicits a unitary response in the brain. This in turn effects a suitable motor discharge in bodily movements.

Is this the whole story? Moralists are agreed that it is but a part of behavior; what the remainder is we shall attempt to unfold in the sequel.

-47-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Principles of Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 572

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.