CHAPTER VII
THE ÆSTHETIC APPEAL

We enter now the precincts of another kind of sanction and must study a new set of mental facts. By good right, we should face at once the crucial question whether art has any necessary and persistent relations with moral values. We rarely come upon a systematic apprecation of the elements of beauty without meeting a lively discussion of the theme. Tolstoi introduces it into the first chapter of his "What is Art?" arguing that any task which "demands tremendous labors from the people" should have a clearer definition than is usually accorded it. Guyau, the French æsthetician, has written an instructive treatise on the sociological aspects of the artistic impulse. He quotes the remark of Balzac that "beauty without expression is merely an imposture," meaning that the spontaneous sentiments of any given period are reflected in the conspicuous works of art, as, for example, in Demosthenes' orations against the pretensions of Philip of Macedon. In a broader sense, some authors allege that beauty and goodness are interchangeable terms. No work of art can be beautiful without conveying the ideas of true morality; conversely, no good act can be performed without furnishing material for artistic composition. In short, both extremes of æsthetic theory are unacceptable--"art for art's sake" and art only for its moral lessons--since neither recognizes the identity of beauty and virtue as an unanalyzable factor in every statue, picture, or poem.

But such a judgment is certainly exaggerated; it deprives the æsthetic appeal of much of its force as a sanction in supporting the edicts of moral law. It proceeds on the assumption that, as a recent writer says, "moral law is essentially

-526-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Principles of Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 572

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.