Roman Spring: Memoirs

By Mrs. Winthrop Chanler | Go to book overview

XII
RETURN TO ITALY

THE following summer Uncle Sam hired for us one of the so-called Cliff cottages in Newport. A row of these extended from the old Cliff Hotel, directly next to Cliff Lawn, the summer home of the Chanlers, which was eventually to be mine in later years. The Chanlers were Uncle Sam's grandchildren. Their mother had died some years before, leaving ten small children. The distracted widower, John Winthrop Chanler, had not long survived her. The two oldest boys, Armstrong and Winthrop, known always as Archie and Wintie, were just growing up there were six younger ones-- in all, five boys and three girls; two boys had died before I knew them. Archie and Wintie came to see us very often. We used to take them on catboat sails and picnics. Wintie was the most entirely charming boy I had ever seen, but it never for a moment occurred to me that he was for me and I for him. He was just back from Eton and preparing to enter Harvard College in September.

My father had joined us and so had my brother Marion, which made us all very happy. I went to a good many parties, dinners, luncheons, and dances -- but never felt quite in step with the Newport world. I was too foreign;

-120-

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Roman Spring: Memoirs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • I - Roman Childhood 3
  • II - Palazzo Odescalchi 12
  • III - Villeggiatura 24
  • IV - Theatricals and Weddings 31
  • V - West Prussia in the Seventies 41
  • VI - Florence and Free Thought 56
  • VII - Enter Music 71
  • VIII - Americans in Rome 87
  • IX - The Western World 94
  • X - Californian Exile 104
  • XI - Americana 111
  • XII - Return to Italy 120
  • XIII - Sorrento 150
  • XIV - A Gay Cousin 159
  • XV - Roman Festivities 170
  • XVI - Vita Nuova on Hudson 180
  • XVII - Lodge and Roosevelt 191
  • XVIII - Washington Friends 204
  • XIX - Rome Revisited 214
  • XX - New York Society 230
  • XXI - New York's Compensations 250
  • XXII - Tuxedo Park 260
  • II - Ave Roma 270
  • XXIV - The Spanish War 284
  • XXV - Friendship of Henry Adams 291
  • XXVI - Tyrolese Summers 309
  • Index 315
  • Index 317
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