Roman Spring: Memoirs

By Mrs. Winthrop Chanler | Go to book overview

II
AVE ROMA

IN September 1897 my mother died; we received the news in Bar Harbor, where we had taken a house for the summer. We had tried Tuxedo Park as a home and found it wanting. My husband generously suggested we should go to Rome and settle there for a few years to be near my father so long as he might live; he was then well past his four-score years. So we rented our Tuxedo house and went abroad for an indefinite stay, with our five small children, of whom Laura, the oldest, was ten. Rome was Paradise after the years spent in Washington, New York, and Tuxedo Park. I felt as though my body and soul had come together again after a long separation; for during my exile in the country that should have been my own some part of me was forever there, in the Eternal City, "alone and palely loitering" about the well-remembered places. In the midst of the hurry and high tension of American existence my living ghost had haunted the streets of Rome; at any moment, had anyone asked me the question, I could have told them just where I was -- on the Piazza del Gesù, on the Spanish steps, in the Via della Scrofa or wherever. There was no particular spot to which my thoughts were anchored; my thoughts

-270-

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Roman Spring: Memoirs
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • I - Roman Childhood 3
  • II - Palazzo Odescalchi 12
  • III - Villeggiatura 24
  • IV - Theatricals and Weddings 31
  • V - West Prussia in the Seventies 41
  • VI - Florence and Free Thought 56
  • VII - Enter Music 71
  • VIII - Americans in Rome 87
  • IX - The Western World 94
  • X - Californian Exile 104
  • XI - Americana 111
  • XII - Return to Italy 120
  • XIII - Sorrento 150
  • XIV - A Gay Cousin 159
  • XV - Roman Festivities 170
  • XVI - Vita Nuova on Hudson 180
  • XVII - Lodge and Roosevelt 191
  • XVIII - Washington Friends 204
  • XIX - Rome Revisited 214
  • XX - New York Society 230
  • XXI - New York's Compensations 250
  • XXII - Tuxedo Park 260
  • II - Ave Roma 270
  • XXIV - The Spanish War 284
  • XXV - Friendship of Henry Adams 291
  • XXVI - Tyrolese Summers 309
  • Index 315
  • Index 317
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