Soviet Russia and Indian Communism, 1917-1947: With an Epilogue Covering the Situation Today

By David N. Druhe | Go to book overview

Introduction

The history of Russo-Indian relations may be divided into three basic periods. The first of these basic periods deals with the relations between Czarist Russia and India and may in turn be sub-divided into two sub-periods; namely, the relations between Russia and India of the pre-Mogul and Mogul periods, and between Czarist Russia and the British masters of India after the middle of the eighteenth century. The second of these periods treats on Soviet policies in regard to India from the Bolshevik Revolution of November, (so-called October) 1917 to August, 1947 when the peoples of India were liberated from foreign rule and came to live under the free Indian Union and free Pakistan. The third period is concerned with Soviet relations with India and Pakistan to the present day. This work endeavors to consider the second basic period in some detail.

As regards the first basic period, it may be noted that RussoIndian relations in the cultural sense had their beginnings in the time of the purely unofficial mission of Athanasius Nikitin, a merchant of Tver ( Kalinin) to India between the years 1466 and 1475. Nikitin preserved a record of his journey to the subcontinent in his journal which is known as "A Journey beyond the Three Seas". In this journal Nikitin rendered an interesting account of the mores and manners of India in the epoch prior to the Mogul period.

It was under the auspices of the Mogul Empire that the first effort to establish political relations between India and Russia was initiated. In September, 1532, the Government of Muscovy was astonished by the arrival of an Indian, Tausein Hozya by name, the envoy of Babur, the first Grand Mogul of India. Tausein Hozya bore a letter of recommendation from

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Soviet Russia and Indian Communism, 1917-1947: With an Epilogue Covering the Situation Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 7
  • Introduction 9
  • Chapter One Early Soviet Designs on India 14
  • Chapter Three 68
  • Chapter Four Underground Communism in India 105
  • Chapter Five The United Front 141
  • Chapter Six Soviet Intrigues on India's Frontiers 172
  • Chapter Seven An "Imperialist War" Becomes A "People's War" 199
  • Chapter Eight Indian Communism on the Eve Of Independence 243
  • Epilogue Soviet Russia and Indian Communism 1947-1959 284
  • Notes 304
  • Bibliography 372
  • Index 399
  • Index 401
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