Soviet Russia and Indian Communism, 1917-1947: With an Epilogue Covering the Situation Today

By David N. Druhe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
Early Soviet Designs on India

One week before the revolution which overthrew the ill-fated Provisional Government of Alexander Kerensky, the Russian Bolsheviks were manifesting an interest in India and the East. On October 31, 1917, a Communist agency, known as the "League for the Liberation of the East" called for the overthrow of "Western Imperialism in the East."1 And, shortly afterwards, on November 24, 1917, the newly installed Council of People's Commissars called upon the Indians and the people of the Middle East to "Shake off the tyranny of those who for a hundred years have plundered your land."2

Several months later, in the late spring of 1918, the Bolshevik government published a so-called "Blue Book" on relations between Czarist Russia and India. This "Blue Book", edited by K. M. Troyanovsky, was a "Collection of Secret Documents Taken from the Archives of the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs." Of significance to us here is the introduction by Troyanovsky who expounded the first Soviet viewpoint as regards India.

Troyanovsky devoted a considerable amount of attention to the periodic famines which have beset the people of India and blamed these catastrophes upon ". . . the evil exploitative will of their mighty masters--the English Imperialists who for more than a century have drunk the blood of this unhappy country."3 At the same time he eagerly charged that the British ruled the Indians by means of ruthless "material strength" in the form of their army and police and that they deprived the natives

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Soviet Russia and Indian Communism, 1917-1947: With an Epilogue Covering the Situation Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 7
  • Introduction 9
  • Chapter One Early Soviet Designs on India 14
  • Chapter Three 68
  • Chapter Four Underground Communism in India 105
  • Chapter Five The United Front 141
  • Chapter Six Soviet Intrigues on India's Frontiers 172
  • Chapter Seven An "Imperialist War" Becomes A "People's War" 199
  • Chapter Eight Indian Communism on the Eve Of Independence 243
  • Epilogue Soviet Russia and Indian Communism 1947-1959 284
  • Notes 304
  • Bibliography 372
  • Index 399
  • Index 401
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