Soviet Russia and Indian Communism, 1917-1947: With an Epilogue Covering the Situation Today

By David N. Druhe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE

Communist Intrigue in India

In spite of their initial failures, the Soviets and their Indian minions boldly determined to increase the influence of Bolshevism in the sub-continent. At the Fifth Congress of the Communist International which met from June 17 to July 8, 1924, in Moscow, Comrade Zinoviev in his capacity as Secretary- General of that organization asserted that "the Achilles Heel of the British Empire is India . . . and we must therefore make every effort to develop all possible lines of advance there." 1 Taking his cue from this Soviet leader, M. N. Roy also made a bold front at the Congress. The emigré leader of the Indian Communists not only attacked the upper and middle classes of India, but also the petty bourgeoisie as well for collaborating with the British. However, the Bolshevik Brahmin held that if "we organise the peasantry and the workers, they will force the pace for the petty bourgeoisie, who are now ready to compromise with imperialism" and so make them "bolder and less inclined to compromise" with the British masters of India. 2 Roy also praised the greater class consciousness of the Indian workers, hailing a strike of a large number of textile workers for three months in Bombay, an event occurring earlier in 1924, as a manifestation of the growing class struggle in India. 3

Of greatest significance, however, was Roy's appeal that the British Communist party recognize that its "task . . . transcends the boundaries of the British Isles." 4 This, in effect, meant that the leaders of the international Communist movement were beginning to realize that Roy's work in Western

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Soviet Russia and Indian Communism, 1917-1947: With an Epilogue Covering the Situation Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 7
  • Introduction 9
  • Chapter One Early Soviet Designs on India 14
  • Chapter Three 68
  • Chapter Four Underground Communism in India 105
  • Chapter Five The United Front 141
  • Chapter Six Soviet Intrigues on India's Frontiers 172
  • Chapter Seven An "Imperialist War" Becomes A "People's War" 199
  • Chapter Eight Indian Communism on the Eve Of Independence 243
  • Epilogue Soviet Russia and Indian Communism 1947-1959 284
  • Notes 304
  • Bibliography 372
  • Index 399
  • Index 401
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