Soviet Russia and Indian Communism, 1917-1947: With an Epilogue Covering the Situation Today

By David N. Druhe | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
An "Imperialist War" Becomes A
"People's War"

The Nazi-Soviet pact of August 23, 1939, and the subsequent outbreak of the Second World War with Russia becoming the ostensible friend rather than the sworn enemy of the Hitler regime, was as confusing to the Indian Comrades as it was confounding to the Communists in the rest of the world. 1 However, the new line was helpful to the Indian Communists in that the anti-British turn in Soviet foreign policy made it possible for the Indian Communists all the more bitterly to denounce the alleged machinations of British imperialism.

Consequently, when it broke out, the Indian Communists branded the war as an "imperialist" one and appealed to the Indian masses to carry on active demonstrations against the involvment of India in the conflict. For example, Communists were active in a mass demonstration against India's participation in the war, held in September, 1939, in Madras in which, it is said, 10,000 persons participated. They were also active in an anti-imperialist and anti-war conference held at Nagpur the following month, 2 which Red leader B. T. Ranadive "inaugurated" and in which Communist dominated or influenced groups such as the national Kisan Sabha and the All-India Students' Federation were very much in evidence. 3

The Communists were not long able publicly to express their views, a right which they had partly been able to manifest under the Congress ministries before September, 1939. Soon after the inception of the conflict, the Communists' two leading journals, published in Bombay, the "National Front" and the "Kranti" were banned. 4 However, the Indian Communists con-

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Soviet Russia and Indian Communism, 1917-1947: With an Epilogue Covering the Situation Today
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Table of Contents 7
  • Introduction 9
  • Chapter One Early Soviet Designs on India 14
  • Chapter Three 68
  • Chapter Four Underground Communism in India 105
  • Chapter Five The United Front 141
  • Chapter Six Soviet Intrigues on India's Frontiers 172
  • Chapter Seven An "Imperialist War" Becomes A "People's War" 199
  • Chapter Eight Indian Communism on the Eve Of Independence 243
  • Epilogue Soviet Russia and Indian Communism 1947-1959 284
  • Notes 304
  • Bibliography 372
  • Index 399
  • Index 401
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