The History of Political Parties in the Province of New York, 1760-1776

By Carl Lotus Becker; Arthur M. Schlesinger | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V
THE ELECTION OF DELEGATES TO THE FIRST CONTINENTAL CONGRESS

The tea episode was hardly closed before the coercion acts opened the way for a determined effort to carry out the conservative policy. The Boston port act reached New York from England on Thursday, May 12,1 and was at once re-printed and circulated about the city in the form of handbills.2 The conservatives were determined to take the initiative, and within the next two days, probably on Friday, May 13, a notice was posted at the Coffee House, inviting the merchants to meet at the "house of Mr. Samuel Fraunces, on Monday evening, May 16."3 About the same time, very likely after the above notice was posted, the radicals held a meeting composed, it was said, of "a number of respectable merchants and the body of mechanics," at which there was named a committee of twenty-five, which included the leading members of the old committee of the as-

____________________
1
"Last Thursday Captain Couper arrived from London in 27 days. By him we have received . . . Act of Parliament, that shuts up your Port the first of June." New York Letter, May 14, 1774; Boston Gazette, May 23, 1774. Cf. 4 Am. Arch., 1: 289, note.
2
It appears to have been printed twice. One broadside contained the act alone. The Alarming Boston Port Act, etc.; Broadsides, 1. Another, probably printed on Saturday, contained the act together with some London letters. 4 Am. Arch., 1: 289, note.
3
4 Am. Arch., 1: 293. It is sometimes implied that this meeting was called by the merchants as a result of a letter written to Boston promising hearty support by New York. Cf. Leake, Life of John Lamb, 87. Me letter In question was, however, not written till May 14. It was published in the Boston Gazette May 23, and the merchants in New York learned of it, for the first time apparently, from the Boston Gazette towards the end of the month. Cf Colden to Tryon, May 31, 1774; Letter-Book, 2: 343. New York Mercury, June 6, 1774. The view of Leake is derived from a New York letter dated May 31. Cf. 4 Am. Arch., 1: 299, note.

-112-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The History of Political Parties in the Province of New York, 1760-1776
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 322

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.