Edward Moxon: Publisher of Poets

By Harold G. Merriam | Go to book overview

Chapter 11 NEW NAMES

THOMAS NOON TALFOURD

"OF HUMOR he had not a particle in his composition," gossiped Cyrus Redding of Thomas Noon Talfourd.1 As an orator he "was certainly very richly gifted. His eloquence was innate," asserted a member of the Oxford Circuit.2 In 1833 Crabb Robinson confided in his diary that Talfourd "is a prudent man and is not deceived by his prosperity."3Robert Browning, in a letter to Talfourd, wrote that his poetry had been "good for one of the best events in my life--it procured me the knowledge of you, the friendship with you."4 And the London world of that day agreed that Talfourd's speeches in defense of Moxon and on copyright were masterful and brilliant. In 1835 he was returned to Parliament for Reading and sat as member through several sessions, proposing the Custody of Infants Act and the Copyright Act. In 1849 he was made a judge of the Common Pleas with the honor of knighthood,5 and in spite of his busy life he composed, as Henry Chorley thought, "the most noble, highly-finished, and picturesque modern classical tragedy existing on the English stage [Ion]."6 He also narrated his travels and at Moxon's request edited the letters and wrote the life of Charles Lamb. Moxon received his legal advice until the judge died, in 1854. However, since his own brother William was a barrister and another brother, Henry, was a solicitor, he referred to Talfourd only his most important legal matters.

Talfourd came to know Lamb in 1815, through William Evans, owner of Tke Pamphleteer, and, according to Redding, thought

____________________
1
Fifty Years Recollections, II, 144.
2
A Memoir of Mr. Justice Talfourd, by a member of the Oxford Circuit, p. 10.
3
Unpublished diaries, Vol. XV, May 19, 1833. In Dr. Williams's Library, London.
4
B. M. 36878 f 70.
5
From the Records of the Middle Temple, London.
6
Personal Reminiscences of Chorley, Planche and Young, I, 113. Chorley I's writings did much to sustain the reputation of the Athenaeum.

-150-

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Edward Moxon: Publisher of Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Chapter I the Years Before Publishing, 1801-30 1
  • Chapter 2- Conditions of Publishing Before 1830 17
  • Chapter 3 Early Business Years 25
  • Chapter 4 Business Expansion 47
  • Chapter 5 Moxon and Charles - And Mary Lamb 60
  • Chapter 6 Business Policies 75
  • Chapter 7- Typical Relations With Authors 89
  • Chapter 8 Trade Relations 101
  • Chapter 9- Moxon and Established Writers 110
  • Chapter 10 Moxon and Wordsworth 130
  • Chapter 11 New Names 150
  • Chapter 12 Moxon and Tennyson 169
  • Chapter 13 Later Years 188
  • Chapter 14 Evaluation 196
  • Bibliography 201
  • Index 213
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