American Civil Rights Policy from Truman to Clinton: The Role of Presidential Leadership

By Steven A. Shull | Go to book overview

8
The Impact of Presidential Policies

For presidents, civil rights policies are usually discretionary. The branches of government often cooperate on civil rights, but that is not to say that civil rights policies are bipartisan. Although not as political as economic policy, partisanship over civil rights is growing. Charges of reverse discrimination increasingly are dividing the parties and, thus, the nation ( Edsall and Edsall 1991). This situation has occurred with the president changing from a civil rights liberal ( Carter) to civil rights conservatives ( Reagan and Bush) and back again to moderate liberalism ( Clinton).

Almost immediately upon assuming office in January 1981, Reagan suspended Carter's affirmative action guidelines and reduced their enforcement. During the same year he decreased the number of contractors required to file written affirmative action plans, saying that smaller companies need not comply. Many companies cut back their equal opportunity offices ( Edsall and Edsall, 1991, 163). During 1985-86, the administration debated whether to overturn a 1965 executive order on equal employment opportunity ( Washington Post National Weekly Edition, January 27, 1986, 37, and January 11, 1986, A-3).

Reagan also abolished the merit selection panels for district court judgeships and reduced litigation efforts. Carter had targeted specific industries for compliance, but Reagan ended this practice. Reagan drastically reduced the budget of the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs and cut its personnel by 52 percent. One scholar charges that "the Reagan administration was more concerned with pro-

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Civil Rights Policy from Truman to Clinton: The Role of Presidential Leadership
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 295

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.