The Lost Panoramas of the Mississippi

By John Francis McDermott | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Portrait in Oils by POMARÈDE

On September 13, 1849, an advertisement in the St. Louis Missouri Republican announced that "POMAREDE'S ORIGINAL PANORAMA of the Mississippi River and Indian life, Painted in Oil, will be Exhibited at the Odd Fellow's Hall, commencing on Monday Evening, the 17th September. The painting comprises four sections, embracing Indian Scenery, War Dances., Buffalo Hunts, Dog Feasts, &c., &c., Dissolving and Moonlight Views, Prairies on Fire, Steamboats and Mechanical Moving Figures of Steamboats, Flat Boats and Indians. The fourth section will conclude with a beautiful dissolving view of the Great Fire at St. Louis, on the night of 17th May, representing that awful and terrific conflagration in all its fury, as it appeared to the distracted citizens. Gradually the devouring element subsides, and daylight appears, like a messenger from God, to stay the wreck of destruction. The river is seen gorged with half sunken wrecks and charred remains of 23 steamboats, and the district presents a sad spectacle, blackened and broken walls, and tottering chimnies rearing their summits, ghastly gloom over the smouldering ruins."

-145-

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