Beijing Spring, 1989: Confrontation and Conflict: the Basic Documents

By Qiao Li; Michel Oksenberg et al. | Go to book overview

We must now concentrate our efforts on doing the three things which I mentioned above. All disputes, or arguments, are not allowed for at least two years. The line, guiding principles, and policies of the Thirteenth CPC National Congress remain unchanged. Some improper words must not be repeated. There is one more point I want to stress--that is, comrades of the Standing Committee must concentrate their minds on grasping construction. The party must grasp it. Things will not proceed without grasping construction well.


60
Why Good Intentions May Lead to Turmoil and Riot

Source: China Daily ( Beijing--in English) ( June 23, 1989).

Now that the riot in Beijing has been largely quelled, people are beginning to think twice about why the students' good intentions and justifiable aspirations for democracy eventually led to turmoil and riot. A People's Daily article tries to offer an answer. Excerpts follow:

Most of the students were unaware that from the very beginning their good intentions were shaped to the ends of a handful of conspirators whose goal is to negate the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party.

In fact, as early as the beginning of 1989, these people began planning to fan disturbances through the opportunities offered by the seventieth anniversary of the May 4th Movement and the fortieth anniversary of the founding of the People's Republic of China. They advocated the "overthrow of the socialist system," and "ending the rule of the Chinese Communist Party." They said that Marxism was totally utopian.

When the April 26 editorial of the People's Daily pointed out that their true purpose was to create chaos, they cloaked their ulterior motives by claiming they opposed corruption."

Whenever the students seemed to calm down, these people tried to rekindle their agitation.

They egged the students on to stage strikes, hunger strikes and stop army trucks. They were actually taking the striking students hostage to pressure the government to agree to their terms.

Most of the students were unaware of the scheme. But once they were un-

-388-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Beijing Spring, 1989: Confrontation and Conflict: the Basic Documents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 406

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.