Biological Specificity and Growth

By A. M. Shechtman; M. W. Woerdeman et al. | Go to book overview

IX. COMPATIBILITY AND NON- COMPATIBILITY IN TISSUE TRANSPLANTATION

BY HARRY S. N. GREENE

THE transplantation of tissues depends on a variety of factors, the most important being the constitutional relationship of the donor and recipient, the status of the transplant, and the site of transplantation. The constitutional factors concerned are generally considered to be genetic in nature and of such significance that differences in strain or species constitute barriers to the exchange of tissues. There is evidence, however, that other nongenetic characteristics may be of equal importance, and further that the success or failure of transfers performed under identical genetic circumstances may be conditioned by the status of the transplant or the site of transplantation. The interrelationship of the factors determining transplantability has been of primary interest in this laboratory, and the present discussion is based on data derived from the study of those factors.

In essence the investigation consisted of a comparison of the transplantation reactions of various tissue states in hosts of different constitutional status. The tissues investigated included normal adult tissue, normal embryonic or fetal tissue, hyperplastic or benign tumor tissue, precancerous tissue, and cancer. These tissues were transferred to other regions in the same host (autologous), to unrelated normal and abnormal individuals of the same species (homologous), and to animals of alien species (heterologous). The anterior chamber of the eye, the brain, the subcutaneous space, the testicle, and various internal organs were used as transplantation sites.


I. ADULT TISSUES

Adult tissues generally survive transfer back elsewhere in the primary host or to unrelated animals of the same species, but heterologous transfer is invariably unsuccessful.

____________________
1
Department of Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine. The original investigations reported in this chapter were supported in part by grants from the Medical Research and Development Board, Office of the Surgeon General, Department of the Army, under Contract No. DA-40-007md-30; the Jane Coffin Childs Memorial Fund for Medical Research; the National Cancer Institute; National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service; and the American Cancer Society upon recommendation by the Committee on Growth of the National Research Council.

-177-

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