William Dorsey's Philadelphia and Ours: On the Past and Future of the Black City in America

By Roger Lane | Go to book overview

Part I
THE MEDIUM AND THE MESSAGE: THE DORSEY COLLECTION AND THE BLACK PORTRAIT IN THE POPULAR PRESS

Much of black urban history is still murky simply because of the scarcity of records needed to reconstruct it. During the 19th century certainly, blacks as historical actors were scarcely visible to the dominant white population, clearly not in charge of the major political and economic decisions that shaped their lives. Most, too, did not leave the kind of formally written sources, letters, diaries, and reminiscences, of which traditional history is built. But while there are some of the same gaps in the Philadelphia story as in those of other cities, it can be told better than most because of several unique advantages. W. E. B. Du Bois, who published his great study of The Philadelphia Negro in 1899, is only the best known of a series of observers who have traced the black experience from colonial times to the present. But for the raw material of history nothing is more important than the unique collections left by the members of the American Negro Historical Society, above all its custodian William Henry Dorsey. 1

Dorsey was named the Society's "custodian" perhaps because his own contributions were central to it, certainly bigger than those of any other member. Some aspects of his life, and his family's, remain as obscure as those of other and less eminent urban blacks. As much as can be known will be woven, with his neighbors', throughout this book, as part of the occupational, political, religious, and cultural history his legacy has enabled. But its outlines are appropriate here, in the introduction to Part I, as

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
William Dorsey's Philadelphia and Ours: On the Past and Future of the Black City in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 490

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.