Political Development in Eastern Europe

By Gabriel Almond; Jan F. Triska et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 13
NATIONAL-INTERNATIONAL LINKAGES IN YUGOSLAVIA: THE POLITICAL CONSEQUENCES OF OPENNESS

William Zimmerman

Considerations of space rule out the possibility here of an all-encompassing treatment of the impact of international-national linkages on Yugoslav internal political development. (Even within the more limited focus of this essay, there are important gaps in our knowledge that, when filled, might produce some alteration in the nature of our assessments.) Instead the focus is on the consequences of a phenomenon unique to Yugoslavia among Communist countries, namely, the enormous migration, as a result of conscious policy choices by the Yugoslav regime, of workers abroad. *

How unique that phenomenon is when contrasted with patterns typically associated with Communist systems, and how much it typifies -- and reinforces --

This essay is part of a larger, ongoing project, the theme of which is the impact of the international environment on Yugoslav political development. Data employed in the paper were obtained while in Yugoslavia as Fulbright-Hays Fellow in 1970 and during a brief visit in June 1973 under auspices of a Ford grant to associates of the University of Michigan's Center for Russian and East European Studies for research pertaining to mass migration, mobility, and social change. The author benefited from many conversations with Yugoslav scholars and wishes in particular to thank Professors Ivo Vinski of the Economics Institute (Zagreb) and Ivo Baucic of the Geographic Institute (Zagreb), and the Institute for International Politics and Trade ( Belgrade), which provided with an office and seven months without committee meetings during the 1970 stay.

____________________
*
I stress the role of conscious policy choices because I believe that in our effort ultimately to construct typologies of systems with regard to their degree of linkages to the international system, we are apt to focus on more ecological factors. Size, degree of authoritarianism, and the existence or lack thereof of a potential counterelite in exile all matter. Nevertheless, it is to policy choices primarily that we must look to explain the nature and consequences of the penetration of a national system.

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