Washington Wife: Journal of Ellen Maury Slayden from 1897-1919

By Ellen Maury Slayden | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIXTEEN
1912

January 20

Sometimes it seems as if the difference between big men and the herd is not so much what the big ones know as what they want to know, the consciousness, often increasing with the years, of "the little known, the unknown vast." Mr. Adams, old in years and honors, is a striking example of it. This letter came from him today:

1701 Massachusetts Ave.
Jan. 20, 1912

My dear Mr. Slayden:

Thanks for your note of the other day and the enclosure.

As to the enclosure it is only suggestive of one thought to my mind,-- to wit, how long would I last, or be above ground, if I were in President Taft's place? I am in my 77th year, and naturally of a somewhat high-strung disposition. My impression is that if I were in Taft's place, by the third day I would cease to sleep, by the end of the first week it would get thoroughly on my nerves, and by the end of the first month, like the late lamented Wm. Henry Harrison--at a period of life then years younger than that at which I have now arrived--I should be carried forth from the White House feet foremost.

Turning, however, from these immaterial matters, may I ask if you know anything of the Association mentioned in this letter? You have been giving some attention to the subject of roads, and I suspect that this organization is simply one designed to get money out of the United States. If such is the fact I do not care to have anything to do with it.

I remain, etc.

Charles F. Adams

The enclosure was one suggesting Mr. A.'s own fitness for the presidential office, and J. says his suspicions of the organization mentioned were entirely correct. He is always alert to protect the taxpayer from such schemes and his scorn of the pension grabber is open and biting.

-165-

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Washington Wife: Journal of Ellen Maury Slayden from 1897-1919
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Preface xix
  • Foreword xxiii
  • Chapter One - 1897 1
  • Chapter Two - 1898 11
  • Chapter Three - 1899 22
  • Chapter Four - 1900 31
  • Chapter Five - 1901 35
  • Chapter Six - 1902 40
  • Chapter Seven - 1903 46
  • Chapter Eight - 1904 51
  • Chapter Nine - 1905 64
  • Chapter Ten - 1906 81
  • Chapter Eleven - 1907 91
  • Chapter Twelve - 1908 104
  • Chapter Thirteen - 1909 116
  • Chapter Fourteen - 1910 131
  • Chapter Fifteen - 1911 147
  • Chapter Sixteen - 1912 165
  • Chapter Seventeen - 1913 192
  • Chapter Eighteen - 1914 230
  • Chapter Twenty - 1916 273
  • Chapter Twenty-One - 1917 290
  • Chapter Twenty-Two - 1918 319
  • Chapter Twenty-Three - 1919 354
  • About the Author 387
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