Charles the Second, King of England, Scotland, and Ireland

By Ronald Hutton | Go to book overview

7 The Year of Restoration, 1660-1661

UPON arrival in London, Charles settled down at the greatest of all English royal palaces, Whitehall. There he remained almost continuously for two years, and during every winter thereafter. He was to die in it. It has been likened by the historian Kevin Sharpe to 'an unwieldy, chaotic and decaying hotel'. 1 Some rooms housed government departments such as the Treasury and those of the Secretaries of State, while most of the hundreds of others were apportioned amongst important courtiers. Charles initially intended to rebuild the entire place, but when financial constraints made this impossible he contented himself with restructuring his own apartments three times over in twenty years. This redevelopment, and the lack of any plans of any of his suites, make it impossible to describe the layout of the rooms concerned. That this is so is very frustrating, for so many of the key events of the reign were to be set there. Meetings of the Privy Council and formal receptions of ambassadors were held slightly further north in the palace, in the Council Chamber and Banqueting Hall respectively. But most meetings and consultations took place in the set of rooms beside the Thames, the Presence Chamber, Withdrawing Room, Privy Chamber, and Bedchamber. Around these was a network of corridors and stairs which enabled Charles and his visitors to move with relative secrecy. The Bedchamber was formally the most private of these 'Privy Apartments', being restricted to its staff, to princes and important councillors, and to people invited by the King, but during the day it seems to have been often as crowded and noisy as the others. Often Charles would withdraw to a small chamber leading off it, the Cabinet or Closet, where he kept paintings and statuettes. Among these objets d'art he received reports from state servants and held private consultations. But there were other small rooms in the suite, with multiple locks to which only the King and his Page of the Backstairs (an entirely passive and apolitical servant) had keys. These likewise were used for secret discussions. 2 Thus the architecture of the palace was admirably suited to Charles's style of kingship, at once very open and very devious. His habit of strolling through the great warren of rooms, or in the garden planted in

-133-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Charles the Second, King of England, Scotland, and Ireland
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Illustrations xiv
  • I - Boyhood 1
  • 2 - The Exiled Prince of Wales 15
  • 3 - A King in Search of a Realm, 1649-1650 34
  • 5 - A King in Search of Quarters, 1651-1656 71
  • 6 - The Pensioner of Spain, 1656-1660 100
  • 7 - The Year of Restoration, 1660-1661 133
  • 8 - The Fight for the Settlements, 1661-1664 166
  • 10 - The Ministry of Arlington, 1688-1672 254
  • 11 - Charles's Second Dutch War, 1672-1674 287
  • 12 - The End of King Louis's War, 1674-1678 320
  • 13 - Collapse of a System, 1678-1679 357
  • 14 - The Quest for Men and Measures, 1679-1681 381
  • 15 - Towards a New Way of Ruling, 1681-1685 404
  • 16 - Conclusion: Monarch in a Masquerade 446
  • References 459
  • Notes 461
  • Index 543
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 558

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.