Charles the Second, King of England, Scotland, and Ireland

By Ronald Hutton | Go to book overview

12 The End of King Louis's War, 1674-1678

THE next four years of Charles's reign are among the best studied, most especially in the publications of Professors Browning and Haley. 1 Their events are well known to scholars, and there are few sources unused which can add substantially to the story. Three different contributions can be made here to a familiar tale. First, this book will of course make its own interpretations of the facts, and add fresh details. Second, it will trace the interpretation of English politics by those of the other realms, as has not fully been done before. And third, it will take up a slightly different perspective upon the whole period. Very often, these years have been seen as an interlude of comparatively peaceful and successful government between two crises, given unity by the leadership of a remarkable minister, Danby. This is quite justifiable. It may, however, be fundamentally more true to regard this time as one in which Britain remained towed in the wake of Louis of France, and to see the period's unity provided by the need to react to the continuing war upon the Continent. From this perspective, the record of government is one of a series of attempts to ward off disaster, culminating in a catastrophe greater than that which had struck it in 1673-4.

Certainly to Charles and his English ministers, the rest of the year 1674 did seem like a blessed relief after the trials of its first two months. There was no project in the King's mind of setting up one adviser over the rest. Rather, it was a matter of settling down with his new team, the men who had survived the war years, Arlington and James, and the men whom those years had brought to power, Latimer, Finch, and Henry Coventry. Until 1679 they formed between them most of the Foreign Affairs Committee. Despite personal dislikes they co-operated as gracefully as any of Charles's teams of advisers before, and generally reached decisions by large majorities. During 1674 they were united in the sentiment that a fresh session of Parliament was best left to another year. Only Henry Coventry opposed this policy, and in September Charles prorogued the Houses until April 1675. He then told the French ambassador that the decision had been a coup de maître, taken by him personally without reference to his advisers

-320-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Charles the Second, King of England, Scotland, and Ireland
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Illustrations xiv
  • I - Boyhood 1
  • 2 - The Exiled Prince of Wales 15
  • 3 - A King in Search of a Realm, 1649-1650 34
  • 5 - A King in Search of Quarters, 1651-1656 71
  • 6 - The Pensioner of Spain, 1656-1660 100
  • 7 - The Year of Restoration, 1660-1661 133
  • 8 - The Fight for the Settlements, 1661-1664 166
  • 10 - The Ministry of Arlington, 1688-1672 254
  • 11 - Charles's Second Dutch War, 1672-1674 287
  • 12 - The End of King Louis's War, 1674-1678 320
  • 13 - Collapse of a System, 1678-1679 357
  • 14 - The Quest for Men and Measures, 1679-1681 381
  • 15 - Towards a New Way of Ruling, 1681-1685 404
  • 16 - Conclusion: Monarch in a Masquerade 446
  • References 459
  • Notes 461
  • Index 543
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 558

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.