ESP and Personality Patterns

By Gertrude Raffel Schmeidler; R. A. McConnell | Go to book overview

Introductory Note

SUBSTANTIAL progress has been made in the last twenty years in the experimental analysis of paranormal phenomena. Utilizing the strict controls which are properly demanded today, investigators have gone beyond the sheer "demonstration" of such phenomena and have begun to study the psychological principles which underlie the capacity for extrasensory processes.

Dr. Gertrude R. Schmeidler is a clinical psychologist who has been doing pioneer research in this division of parapsychology. At Harvard in the fall of 1942 she began an examination of the relation between attitude toward extrasensory perception (ESP) and the actual ability to demonstrate ESP in a card-guessing task. In several large cycles of experimental work she found that those persons who believed in the possibility of ESP were able to score, on the whole, a little above chance expectation while those who disbelieved in it tended to score below expectation, with a difference achieving well defined statistical significance.

From this simple beginning she evolved at Harvard and later at the City College of New York a series of studies utilizing the Rorschach projective test and other well known psychological procedures to explore personality dimensions in relation to ESP performance.

She has been joined in this volume by Dr. R. A. McConnell, a physicist whose broad conception of experimental research and thorough application of modern statistical methods has greatly strengthened the presentation of these studies.

It has been my privilege to be associated with this research in a counseling capacity, and the progress represented by the appearance of this book is a source of personal satisfaction.

GARDNER MURPHY

-v-

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