ESP and Personality Patterns

By Gertrude Raffel Schmeidler; R. A. McConnell | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

THE RESEARCH that is reported here, and the thinking behind that research, derive almost entirely from Gardner Murphy. It was Murphy who, in his seminar at Harvard, transformed GRS's vague curiosity about psychic research into a serious interest; it was he who initiated the first of these experiments by offering both funds and a basic hypothesis ("ESP arises in an unconscious, highly motivated state, free from conscious censorship")--a hypothesis incisive enough to be stimulating and yet general enough to leave to the experimenter the pleasure of working out the details. Through the years he continued to find the financial means for the research; and his encouragement when the work went slowly was vital in its continuation. His knowledge of the necessary experimental safeguards has helped to avoid pitfalls; his advice about the directions the research should take has largely determined its outline (it was he, for example, who suggested the use of both Rorschach and Picture-Frustration Study); and his insistence on the need for repetition and then further repetition has resulted in the accumulation of enough data to yield results that are statistically significant instead of merely provocative.

We gratefully acknowledge our further indebtedness:

To R. J. Snowdon, whose painstaking assistance to RAM in many phases of the manuscript preparation has hastened publication by a year.

To T. N. E. Greville and J. A. Greenwood, for their careful reading of our manuscript in the role of mathematical statisticians.

To J. G. Pratt and S. G. Soal who checked the accuracy of our reviews of their work in Chapter 2.

To the following instructors who lent their classes for the gathering of data: Ruth Berenda, Genevieve Chase, Rudolph Ekstein, Eugene Hartley, Rose Kushner, Gardner Murphy, Burke Smith, Virginia Staudt, William Triebel, Edith Wladkowsky, and Bohdan Zawadzki.

-ix-

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