ESP and Personality Patterns

By Gertrude Raffel Schmeidler; R. A. McConnell | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Evidence that ESP Occurs

THIS CHAPTER is directed toward the person who is unfamiliar with psychic research. Our purpose in it is not to summarize all the research on ESP, nor to describe all the well controlled, careful research, nor even to describe that part of the well controlled research which offers important insights into the nature of ESP. All we hope to do here is to give the reader enough background so that he can accept ESP as a process that has already been established--a process just as real as vision, hearing, or learning, although less familiar than these and usually much less accurate. It is the contention of the authors that anyone competent to judge the authenticity of scientific findings, who is intellectually honest and has read the relevant material, must agree, however reluctantly, that ESP occurs. Here, then, is a summary of part of the relevant material.1

In 1919, at the University of Groningen ( Netherlands), Brugmans, Heymans, and Weinberg [ 1922] performed a well planned experiment and obtained a remarkable result. They used for their major series only one subject, a student who in previous informal tests had seemed to show telepathic ability. The subject sat in a chair in front of a board which was marked off into squares of about two inches, making six rows and eight columns. Rows were designated by numerals; columns by letters. The subject's task was to find a particular square on this board. He made 187 trials. The target square was determined before each trial by one of the experimenters, who chose it by drawing a slip from each of two bags. One bag contained slips numbered from 1 to 6; the other contained slips lettered from A to H. Having drawn a slip

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1
In another publication RAM [ 1957] has reviewed the evidence for ESP from a methodological point of view, and has discussed the relation of psi phenomena to several fields of science and the nature of the difficulties which have prevented the universal acceptance of these phenomena.

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