ESP and Personality Patterns

By Gertrude Raffel Schmeidler; R. A. McConnell | Go to book overview

but there are many references to personal but actual experiences, observed and reported in the fashion of unimaginative reporters. They feel an urge to justify their percepts. They are apt to say that a certain lake looks just like the blot they are looking at. Thus they describe many objective details, giving few if any descriptions of their subjective feelings. Imaginative elements are frequently retracted when a more accurate perception does not seem to justify them. The chance and below-chance groups "see," and manifest no wish to experience the feeling of hidden possibilities. There is likely to be scientific sobriety.

In a separate project, Bruno Klopfer has examined the records of some ESP subjects whose scores were unusually high. He was informed that these were the records of "good" subjects, and was asked to point out any outstanding characteristics that they showed, and any characteristics that they had in common. Although he was not able to study them sufficiently to arrive at a firm conclusion, his impression was that these records showed an unusual tendency to accept, as if they were not contradictory, different interpretations of the same area. For the two subjects whose ESP performance was most outstanding, he commented that they had the "possibility of multiple personality. At one level they showed an ordinary, banal mental approach with good adjustment; and without integration, at a different level of personality, they showed a flair for the symbolic and the abstract."

The lack of integration which Dr. Klopfer remarked is reminiscent of Dr. Piotrowski's analysis. (It will be recalled that the comments were made about different subjects.) In general, the major point of similarity between the two statements was the emphasis on the fact that the high-scoring subjects permitted themselves to be stimulated in order to enjoy the play of their imagination, and felt less challenged than do most people to try to justify discrepanies, or to "correct" the details of what they saw.


Summary

The Rorschach was used both quantitatively and qualitatively in a search for ESP-personality correlates. The quantitative search,

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