The Chronicle of San Juan de la Peña: A Fourteenth-Century Official History of the Crown of Aragon

By Pedro IV; Lynn H. Nelson | Go to book overview

The Kings of Aragon

Chapter 15 WHY THERE IS NO COUNT IN ARAGON

Up to now, we have dealt with events in the kingdom of Navarre and county of Aragon simultaneously. We did this because the count of Aragon was always subject to the king of Navarre. For this reason, it was acceptable that we should speak of all of these things together. But with the partition of the kingdom [on the death of King Sancho ], Ramiro held the county of Aragon absolutely and without any subjection. For this reason, he was made king. Wherefore we justly intend to write a chronicle, without any extraneous matters, concerning him and his successors, who successively and without interruption ruled in Aragon.


Chapter 16
THE PARTITION OF THE KINGDOMS OF NAVARRE AND ARAGON, AND KING RAMIRO [1, 1035-1064]55

When the emperor was dead and the partition of his lands had been effected, King Ramiro reigned in the realm of Aragon because it had come to him, as was said above, by gift of his stepmother, Mayor or Geloira, wife of the emperor. She had ample reason to grant him this favor, because he had freed her from the charges levelled against her, as was related in greater detail in a recent chapter.

In the course of time, Gonzalo, the son of the emperor, ruled in Sobrarbe, Ribagorza, and in other lands conferred upon him by his father the emperor. He had gone out to hunt on a certain day and was treacherously murdered on the bridge of Montclús by a knight of his called Ramónat of Gascony.56 He was buried in San Victorián [de Sobrarbe]. Since he left no heir, the people of the land found themselves bereft of a

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