The Chronicle of San Juan de la Peña: A Fourteenth-Century Official History of the Crown of Aragon

By Pedro IV; Lynn H. Nelson | Go to book overview

was on that part of the wall struck him in the right side with an arrow that found its mark through the sleeve of his shirt.

Although he realized that he had been hit, the king let no one know, but immediately returned to his tent and ordered his men to take an oath to Pedro as their king. Everyone was quite astonished at this. When this had been done, he had his son Pedro promise that he would not desist from the siege of the city until he had it in his hands, telling him many things that the future held for him.78 After encouraging his army, he ordered that the arrow be withdrawn from his side, which it had pierced, and gave up his spirit to the Creator.

His son began to rule in such a praiseworthy manner and was so great a comfort to the army that they did not suffer from his dead father's absence.

The body of the king who had ruled for thirty years was carried to Montearagón, where it was kept for six months and fifteen days. This was done because, if a funeral were held, the men of the army would gather for it and it might be noted by the Saracens, who would draw great comfort from what had happened. When this time had elapsed, Sancho's body was solemnly carried to the monastery of San Juan de la Peña where, with the celebration of funeral rites, it was placed in a tomb in front of the altar of Saint John.


Chapter 18
KING PEDRO [1, 1094-1104] AND HIS DEEDS, AND THE CAPTURE OF THE CITY OF HUESCA

When the funeral and interment of King Sancho had been observed, his men elevated his son Pedro as king on the day before the nones of June the same year.79

Wishing to obey the command of his father, Pedro, with his men, then continued the siege of Huesca from a mountain called Sancho.80 It was called this because King Sancho had encamped there with his army when he had besieged the city of Huesca. King Pedro pursued the siege with the greatest effort for six months, through May and the next five. King Abd arRahman of Huesca asked for aid from the king of Zaragoza, named Adalmozaben.81 Unless he provided assistance, Abd at-Rahman warned him, after the king of Huesca had lost his land, the king of Zaragoza would lose

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