The Problem of Sovereignty in the Later Middle Ages: The Papal Monarchy with Augustinus Triumphus and the Publicists

By Michael Wilks | Go to book overview

II. PAPA EST VERUS IMPERATOR

THE importance of the imperial coronation in the hierocratic system rests not only upon the fact that it is the means by which the inferiority of the emperor as a papal creature is demonstrated for all to see, but also in that it provides a vivid indication of the idea that the pope is in every sense the real ruler of the imperium Christi. It is the pope who is the verus imperator and has the exercise of full imperial rights and powers. How else, queried the papalists, can he claim to create the universal emperor unless he himself already possesses a plenitude of imperial power?1 And since it is initially his, there can be no restriction of his use of it when and as he pleases. He is not only the source of imperial power and the overlord of the empire, says Augustinus Triumphus, but he also retains the right to be the emperor himself.

Plenum ius totius imperii est acquisitum summis pontificibus, non solum superioris dominationis verum etiam immediatae administrations, ut ex ipsis tota dependeat imperialis iurisdictio.2

The accuracy of this point of view can, he argues, be tested by what happens during an imperial vacancy. When an emperor dies or is deposed, the power to administer the empire must return to its point of origin: and until he institutes another the pope is forced by the logic of the situation to act as his own emperor. Therefore, during a vacancy, all imperial rights are reserved to the apostolic see.

Papa confert imperatori temporalitatem et administrandi potestatem, cuius signum est quod vacante imperio immediata temporalium administratio et plena iurisdictio apostolicae sedi reservatur.3

____________________
1
E.g. Henry of Cremona, De potestate papae, p. 466, 'Si ergo non haberet potestatem seu dominium imperii, ecclesia non potuisset transferre quod non data haberetur'. This is supported by the Roman law principle that no man may transfer a right which he does not possess himself already, Dig., XLI. i. 20
2
Augustinus Triumphus, Summa, xxxviii. I, p. 224
3
Augustinus Triumphus, Summa, xl. I ad 2, p. 230; cf. Francis Toti, Tractatuscontra Bavarum, p. 78,

-254-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Problem of Sovereignty in the Later Middle Ages: The Papal Monarchy with Augustinus Triumphus and the Publicists
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 619

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.