Hasidic People: A Place in the New World

By Jerome R. Mintz | Go to book overview

7
Boyan and Kapitshinitz: The Sons of the Rebbes

Rabbinic Succession

The death of a Rebbe is a wrenching experience for the court and for each of the Rebbe's followers. To prevent the dissolution of the court a new leader must be named. The Rebbe's sons are the first to be considered in the line of succession to become Rebbe.

In past times in Eastern and Central Europe, an abundance of candidates for the position of Rebbe often existed, so that while one son continued in his father's place, his siblings, unless they sought other ways of earning a livelihood, customarily established new courts of their own in other towns. The proliferation of Rebbes, according to historians and critics of Hasidism, had the effect of weakening and diluting the Hasidic movement. In the United States, up to the present, the reverse has often been the case. In some courts there have been too few candidates, and not everyone with the lineage and the piety to be named Rebbe is willing to accept that role. Some may already be committed to an alternative career or to a different way of life; some are too modest or uncertain; some are too aware of the demands of the position of Rebbe. Wisdom--even informed fear--prompts some men to shrink from becoming a captain in that sea of humanity.


Boyan and Kapitshinitz

The courts of Boyan and Kapitshinitz were among the earliest Hasidim to settle in America and reorganize their courts here. Both were originally located in the eastern region of the Austro-Hungarian empire, and there were many similarities between them. The Boyaner Rebbe, Reb Mordchei Shlomo Friedman, arrived first in the New World in 1927. In 1939, the year following Hitler's entrance into Austria, Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, the Kapitshinitzer Rebbe, fled with his family to New York and settled on Henry Street in lower Manhattan close to the Boyaner.

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hasidic People: A Place in the New World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 434

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.