Sons and Lovers

By D. H. Lawrence; David Trotter | Go to book overview

EXPLANATORY NOTES
2To Edward Garnett: Edward Garnett ( 1868-1936), critic, novelist, playwright, chiefly remembered as publisher's reader for several firms, including Duckworth. On 19 November 1912, Lawrence told Garnett that he would like to dedicate ' Paul Morel' to him. 'But not unless you think it's really a good work. "To Edward Garnett, in Gratitude". But you can put it better.' On 25 February 1913, acknowledging the arrival of the last proofs of Sons and Lovers, he added: 'You did well in the cutting--thanks again. Shall you put in the dedication "To my friend, Edward Garnett"--or just "To Edward Garnett" or what?' Garnett seems to have chosen the least effusive option. In Garnett's copy of Sons and Lovers, Lawrencewrote: 'To my friend and protector in love and literature Edward Garnett from the Author.' For Garnett's role in preparing the novel for publication see Note on the Text.
5'The Bottoms': Lawrence's name for The Breach, a group of terraced houses in Eastwood (here: Bestwood) built for their employees by the local mining company, Barber Walker & Co. (here: Carston, Waite & Co.) in the 1850s. During the late 1880s and early 1890s, the Lawrence family lived at no. 57. The setting of Sons and Lovers is closely modelled on the Eastwood of Lawrence's youth. Readers wishing to identify the originals of specific places or institutions should consult F. B. Pinion, A D. H. Lawrence Companion ( London: Macmillan, 1978) or Keith Sagar (ed.), A D. H. Lawrence Handbook ( Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1982).

gin-pits: shallow mines; the 'gin' was the winch used to haul the coal to the surface. Mining and dialect terms have only been glossed when their meaning is not apparent from the immediate context.

stockingers: stocking weavers who worked in their own homes, renting frames and yarn from the hosiery firms.

Lord Palmerston: Henry Temple, Lord Palmerston ( 1784- 1865), Prime Minister for most of the period 1855-65. Spinney Park is Lawrence's name for High Park Colliery, the first mine in Nottinghamshire to produce 1,000 tons per day.

8eddish: field of stubble used for grazing.

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Sons and Lovers
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xxx
  • Select Bibliography xxxiv
  • A Chronology of D.H. Lawrence xxxvi
  • Contents 3
  • Part I 5
  • Chapter II- The Birth of Paul, and Another Battle 34
  • Chapter III- The Casting off of Morel-The Taking on of William 55
  • Chapter IV- The Young Life of Paul 69
  • Chapter V- Paul Launches into Life 98
  • Chapter VI- Death in the Family 132
  • Part II 165
  • Chapter VII- Lad-And-Girl Love 165
  • Chapter VIII- Stripe in Love 207
  • Chapter IX- Defeat of Miriam 246
  • Chapter X- Clara 287
  • Chapter XI- The Test on Miriam 315
  • Chapter XII- Passion 341
  • Chapter XIII- Baxter Dawes 386
  • Chapter XIV- The Release 428
  • Chapter XV- Derelict 462
  • Appendix 475
  • Explanatory Notes 476
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