The U.S. Army in the War of 1812: An Operational and Command Study

By Robert S. Quimby | Go to book overview

10
VICTORY IN THE WEST

S everal weeks of relative inactivity had followed the repulse of General Procter at Fort Stephenson. Two factors were chiefly responsible. The most important was the naval question, the domination of Lake Erie. It would be very difficult for the Americans to reconquer and hold and Michigan without control of the lakes. Moreover, it would require much larger forces to do so as a long, vulnerable line of communications would have to be held in force. American control of the lakes, on the other hand, would make the reconquest relatively easy and would make Procter's position untenable.

A second factor was the necessity of raising adequate forces for the reconquest and the invasion of Upper Canada. Armstrong had hoped to raise an army of regulars sufficient for the task. But enlistment had been slow and the seven regiments assigned to General Harrison were far below their authorized strength. Since most of the militia under his command were reaching the end of their terms of service, it had been necessary to turn once more to Kentucky to raise a volunteer force sufficient to bring the army to its authorized strength of roughly 7,000.1

Governor Shelby responded with his usual energy and enthusiasm. He issued a statewide call for mounted volunteers as the speediest means of obtaining the necessary forces. The volunteers were to serve mounted or on foot for sixty days after joining the army. Shelby fixed 31 August as the day on which the volunteers were to assemble in Newport on the Ohio, across from Cincinnati.2 In his letter of response to Harrison, Shelby insisted on the necessity of providing adequate forage for his men both in Kentucky and Ohio. He repeated the demand again and again in subsequent letters to the general.

The volunteers came in on the appointed day, and Shelby began crossing them over the Ohio at once. He ordered them to concentrate at Springfield, about twenty- five miles northeast of Dayton. Shelby anticipated that he would have to halt there for a day or two in order to obtain necessary supplies of ammunition and hospital stores. He would also need additional arms, as the Newport arsenal was some seven hundred

-259-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The U.S. Army in the War of 1812: An Operational and Command Study
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • KEY TO DOCUMENT REFERENCES ix
  • Part I xi
  • 1 1
  • 2 - General Hull's Campaign 13
  • 3 55
  • 4 89
  • 5 123
  • 6 147
  • Part II 171
  • 7 173
  • 8 183
  • 9 215
  • 10 259
  • 11 301
  • 12 319
  • 13 371
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 448

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.