The Greening of Protestant Thought

By Robert Booth Fowler | Go to book overview

5
STEWARDSHIP

Since 1970, stewardship has been the environmentalist path most often proposed by Protestant Christians seeking to serve God and God's creation. A good many dissenters have offered other routes--and their numbers grow--but the call to stewardship remains the leading note sounded within green Protestantism. Stewardship is encountered repeatedly in such liberal Protestant publications as the United Methodist Reporter or the Presbyterian Survey, but it has also been endorsed by the conservative General Council of the Assemblies of God, the Evangelical Lutherans, and the Episcopal Church, among many others. 1


Many Stewardships

While stewardship is the most common concept of Protestant environmentalism, its meaning is often contested. 2 At one level, that meaning is quite straightforward. It is the idea that God has designated human beings as "stewards, or guardians, over creation." 3 As we would expect, the foundation or at least part of the justification for Protestant stewardship rests in the Bible, particularly in Genesis. Several passages are crucial, but perhaps the most cited today is Genesis 2:15: "The Lord God took the man and put him in the garden of Eden to till it and keep it" (NRS) or "The Lord God took the man and put him in the Garden of Eden to work it and take care of it" (NIV).

Yet the idea of stewardship comes in many versions. It is a concept that spans a commodious universe whose residents are not all perfectly compatible. Thus, the extensive Protestant discussions of ecological stewardship often involve much more than simple hortatory proclamations and affirmations--though the number of these is not small. There are also many reflections on alternative understandings of stewardship, because stewardship implies significantly different things to different thinkers.

But some common themes percolate among stewardship advocates. One

-76-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Greening of Protestant Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Protestants Face the Environment 13
  • 2 - The Bible as (contested) Foundation 28
  • 3 - Dissent and Protestant Fundamentalism 45
  • 4 - The Argument Over Christianity 58
  • 5 - Stewardship 76
  • Toward Eco-Theology 91
  • Process Environmentalism 108
  • 8 - The Ecofeminist Challenge 123
  • The Protestant Environmentalist Agenda 141
  • 10 - Politics and the Means to Change 159
  • Conclusion 175
  • Notes 181
  • Bibliography 207
  • SCRIPTURE INDEX 237
  • GENERAL INDEX 238
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 244

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.