The Psychology of Prejudice

By Mark P. Zanna; James M. Olson | Go to book overview

which we have seen is easily done--and hence likely to avoid thinking about the personal implications of the data. But the Highs in the personal value confrontation could see their own answers, so it was very difficult for them to kid themselves that the conclusion about equality and selfishness applied to someone else, but not to them.

I suspect personal value confrontation (and perhaps personal religious confrontation) would be particularly troubling to Highs, because they conceive of themselves as "the good people." When they could (or, had to) see a way in which they were falling short of their self-image, many may have resolved to change. They seemingly responded beautifully, nondefensively, constructively when an inconsistency in their thinking was pointed out. Freedom and equality are probably highly compartmentalized concepts in authoritarians' thinking, both endorsed with little thought, as cultural values. But when the connection was made between equality and other people's freedom, a more comprehensive, better integrated understanding of equality in society may have emerged.

Most Highs do not realize they are unusually submissive, conventional, and aggressive ( Altemeyer, 1988). When they learn they are, they usually express some willingness to change. The right-wing authoritarians I study are not irredeemable Nazi-types as a rule, but fearful people whose circumstances have kept them in those tight circles. They would never suspect they are enemies of freedom or equality. But if one can get past the defenses they have thrown up to protect their vulnerabilities, as Rokeach's procedure might, Highs may be remarkably capable of change. This gives hope, if it is true.1


ACKNOWLEDGMENT

I would like to thank Professor Paul Chartrand and Frieda Ahenakew, Heads of the Department of Native Studies at my university, and Donald Salmon, Marvin Brodsky, Ross Hartsough, and Jim Shapiro, my colleagues teaching introductory psychology, for their valued cooperation in these studies.


REFERENCES

Adorno T. W., Frenkel-Brunswik E., Levinson D. J., & Sanford R. N. ( 1950). The authoritarian personality. New York: Harper & Row.

Altemeyer B. ( 1981). Right-wing authoritarianism. Winnipeg: University of Manitoba Press.

____________________
1
A replication of the personal value confrontation procedure in March 1992 produced the following results by the following summer: High controls (N = 14) = 21% support; High experimentals (N = 14) = 50% support; z = 1.58, p < .15 by a two-tailed test. Low controls (N = 13) = 54% support; Low experimentals (N = 16) = 56% support; z = 0.13, p > .50. A fourth experiment is being conducted in 1992-1993.

-147-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Psychology of Prejudice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 348

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.