Religion and the English People, 1500-1640: New Voices, New Perspectives

By Eric Josef Carlson | Go to book overview

APPENDIX
SAMUEL CLARKE, "THE LIFE OF MASTER RICHARD GREENHAM, WHO DYED ABOUT THE YEAR, 1591," FROM THE LIVES OF THRITY-TWO ENGLISH DIVINES, 3D ED. (LONDON, 1677), 12-15.177

I Can yet learn nothing Concerning the Countrey, Parentage, orfirst Education Mr. Richard Greenham The first place, where I find him, was in Pembrook-Hall in Cambridge, where he followed his Studies so hard, and was so eminent for his proficiency in learning, that he was chosen Fellow in that Society, and after a while he was called to a Pastoral charge at Dry- Drayton, not far from Cambridge, and like a faithfull Minister of Jesus Christ, he spared no paines amongst his people, whereby he might advance the good of their souls.

His constant course was to preach twice on the Lords day, and before the evening Sermon to Catechize the young people of the Parish. His manner also was to preach on Mondayes, Tuesdayes, and Wednesdayes, and on Thursdayes to catechize the youth, and again on Frydayes to preach to his people; and that on these week dayes, the people might have the better opportunity to attend upon his Ministry, his course was to be in the Pulpit in the morning so soon as he could well see. He was so earnest, and took such extraordinary pains in his preaching, that his shirt would usually be as wet with sweating, as if it had been drenched in water, so that he was forced, so soon as he came out of the Pulpit, to shift himself, and this wonderfull and excessive paines he took all his time. Twice a day he prayed in his Family, and after Sermon he used to call his servants together, and examined them of what they heard, and what they remembred. And besides all these his publike labours, he studied very hard, rising every day both Winter and Summer, at four of the clock in the morning.

He was very eminent for his charity to the Poor; whereof we have this notable Example: In a time of scarcity, when Barley was at ten groats the Bushell, (which in those daies was an extraordinary price) 178 he by his Prudence brought it to pass, that the poor had it sold to them for four groats the Bushell of every Husband-man in the Town; and thus he effected it.

There were about twenty Plough-holders in the Town,179 all which he by his holy perswasions drew to an agreement amongst themselves, to hire a common Granary, and

____________________
177
Explanatory notes have been provided only for those matters not directly addressed in the essay above.
178
One groat = 4d. Barley at 3s4d per bushel (=26s8d per quarter) suggests that Clarke is referring to 1586-87. Although the barley prices recorded in Thorold Rogers' price tables do not come close to that figure, the evidence on barley for 1586-87 is extremely thin. Wheat prices were "far beyond any previous experience." The indexed figures for barley given by Thirsk also suggest that 1586 is the year in question. A reader in Clarke's day would not find this price "extraordinary," though still somewhat above average. For prices, see James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, 7 vols. ( Oxford. Clarendon Press, 1866- 1902), 4:290, 5:175, 268, 272; Joan Thirsk, ed., The Agrarian History of England and Wales, vol. IV, 1500-1640 ( Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1967), 819. According to Margaret Spufford ( Contrasting Communities, 96-97), barley was the most important crop in Cambridgeshire, especially in the heavy clay villages; oats were second in importance.
179
In 1563, there were 31 households in Dry Drayton. The mortality crisis (probably due to a localized epidemic) in 1570 did not reduce the number of households. The figure of "twenty Plough- holders" seems low, but Michael Sekulla has demonstrated that roughly one-third of the households were headed by laborers and artisans (private communication). On the 1563 survey, see Alan Dyer, "The Bishops' Census of 1563: Its Significance and Accuracy," Local Population Studies 49 ( 1992): 19-37.

-194-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Religion and the English People, 1500-1640: New Voices, New Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 304

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.