Kate Chopin's The Awakening: Screenplay as Interpretation

By Marilyn Hoder-Salmon | Go to book overview

to the dark shadows of the porch. The music stops, and Léonce's voice is heard offscreen. The camera moves further back.

LÉONCE: Coming, Edna?

She seems not to hear; she holds an unlit cigarette gracefully, motionlessly, in her lap.


Scene 10. Present time: Spring. Dr. Mandelet attends to Adèle.

This scene, which is silent and composed of erratic close shots, takes place in Adèle's bedroom. Edna stands by one side of the bed, her arms crossed, her posture tense, her eyes averted. Dr. Mandelet bends over Adèle on the other side. He administers chloroform to her with a gauze mask attached to a long, thin tube. At the other end is a dark green bottle, which is held high by the nurse. The doctor's manner has elements of contradiction; he appears solicitous, yet he also looks bored. As Dr. Mandelet attends to Adèle, shots of Adèle's disheveled hair, shadows on the wall, the empty wicker cradle, and a formal painting of Adèle are interposed. Then the image changes to Edna as she looks at Dr. Mandelet with a disturbed expression on her face. He winks over at her, and then the doctor turns and nods toward the doorway.


Scene 11. Reverie within reverie: Summer, fall. Edna and Adèle.

On an unsteady trajectory the camera moves slowly down from the top of citrus trees to the flowering bushes, then to the low plants bordering the sandy path. All the while a low murmur of voices is heard. Two figures move into the frame at extreme close shot. The camera pulls back to reveal Edna and Adèle, walking arm in arm. Adèle wears a frilly white gown, gloves, several brooches--one at her upright collar. A fan is attached to a long chain, and a bulky brocaded bag is fastened to her waist with pink ribbons. A lacy hat completes the costume. Edna's tailored white dress has a thin vertical lavender stripe. She wears her straw hat. Adèle holds one side of her skirt over her arm, but this is just a gesture, as both their skirts

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Kate Chopin's The Awakening: Screenplay as Interpretation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 188

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.