Kate Chopin's the Awakening: Screenplay as Interpretation

By Marilyn Hoder-Salmon | Go to book overview

Dr. Mandelet takes a wide stance with his walking stick, which he holds in both hands and leans on.

DR. MANDELET: When does Léonce return?

EDNA: (Her arms are folded in the shawl.) Quite soon.

DR. MANDELET: You seem troubled, Edna. Come and see me, we'll have a talk.

EDNA: (She looks offscreen.) If only one might go on dreaming--

The doctor's coach pulls up in front of the walk. Dr. Mandelet signals the driver with his cane. Then there is a close shot of Edna as she entwines her fingers through the design of the gate.

DR. MANDELET: (Offscreen) I would understand, and I tell you there are not many who would.

EDNA: But to wake up and find--

Edna shrugs and opens the gate. She continues:

EDNA: There are moods which overtake me. I don't feel moved to speak. (Pause) You are kind, dear Dr. Mandelet. Good night.

The image changes to a shot of the doctor as he boards his coach. He leans out and waves as the coach moves out of the frame. The horse and carriage sounds are muted. The camera returns to Edna. She stands on the path inside the gate looking out. Behind her a light shines through a front window. In a toneless voice she says to herself:

EDNA: "Yet do the shades come without the sun."

She looks boldly into the camera and then turns as the shot fades.


ACT II

Scene 1. Present time: Spring. Edna finds Robert gone.

The camera faces into the cozy parlor of Edna's "little house" from the front doorway. It is late in the evening, and the room is lit by candlelight. There is a pleasant array of tasteful pictures, books, and

-49-

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