Kate Chopin's The Awakening: Screenplay as Interpretation

By Marilyn Hoder-Salmon | Go to book overview

As Edna closes the door behind her, Mademoiselle speaks to herself. Dusk is visible through the windows.

MLLE REISZ: It grows late.


Scene 9. Present time: Spring. Edna boards a steamer.

A new shot: from a distant and high perspective the camera looks down on the scene of a small port's wharf. There is very little activity. In the middle of one of the piers, Edna stands immobile. In the background, a steamer, the Ada, is being loaded with a commercial cargo. Around her there is an atmosphere of the fishing industry-- nets hang to dry and huge wicker baskets hold fish arranged in careful layers. There are no other passengers. As the camera slides in closer, the captain turns a corner of the Ada's upper deck. He waves to Edna. She looks up and then walks forward to the ship's side. Edna walks up the boarding plank, and no one stops to assist her. As Edna passes from pier to ship we notice a compact sign posted on the wharf. It lists a half-dozen island destinations, one of which is Grand Isle.


Scene 10. Past time: Winter. Adèle visits Edna in the "little house."

A new shot: this is the street in front of Edna's "little house." The day is sunny, with the softness of a southern winter just before spring. Adèle walks into the frame. She has the awkward gait of the last stage of pregnancy. Adèle pauses and looks around her. The image changes to a shot of her as she timidly pushes a gate open. There, in the courtyard, is Edna, busy with a study of a dozing cat.

ADÈLE: So, I have found you!

The cat runs off as Edna jumps up. The two friends embrace, then stand off from each other, hands enclasped.

EDNA: Adèle! I never thought you'd leave home now.

ADÈLE: Mon dieu! It was a sudden urge.

-95-

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