Crises in the Balkans: Views from the Participants

By Constantine P. Danopoulos; Kostas G. Messas | Go to book overview

Preface and Acknowledgments

This disintegration of Yugoslavia and the carnage in Bosnia that followed helped focus public and scholarly attention on a sensitive but hitherto neglected area of the world: the Balkan peninsula. A plethora of academic as well as more narrative oriented works appeared seeking to fill a void and to shed light on the causes and effects of the crises in the area as well as implications for peace in the post-Cold War world. While some of these publications told a shallow and often distorted story, others made a concerted effort and at times succeeded in presenting a more systematic and well grounded analysis. Despite good intentions, however, no publication manages to present a comprehensive, unbiased, and up to date account and analysis behind the Balkan quagmire, of the role of different participants and of their grievances, as well as the security implications of the crisis for the Balkan peninsula and the world.

This collection of original essays specifically prepared for this volume seeks to fill the void. The actors and subjects presented are with no exception complex, rapidly changing, and in some instances still unfolding. The book is structured in a series of concentric circles. It begins with the eye of the storm, Yugoslavia and its successors, extends to neighboring Balkan states, and then reaches out to Russia, the United States, and important European players. The outer circle analyzes the role of major intergovernmental organizations, such as NATO and the United Nations. The introductory essay surveys the nature of ethnonationalism and its relevance to security in the Balkans.

The amount of effort and the sheer logistics behind a multiauthored volume dealing with a complex, changing, and inherently difficult subject as the Balkans cannot be overstated. We would like to express our gratitude and appreciation to each of the contributors for their sincerity, energy, and devotion. The coeditors thank one another for the constructive collaboration, patience, and persistence displayed throughout the project. Numerous individuals also assisted in some way. We are indebted to our academic administrators who did what they could to help bring this project to completion. We would like to thank Norman Provizer, chair of the political science department at the Metropolitan State College of Denver; Roy Christman, instructor of political science at San Jose

-ix-

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Crises in the Balkans: Views from the Participants
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix
  • 1: Ethnonationalism, Security, and Conflict in the Balkans 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2: Of Shatter Belts and Powder Kegs: A Brief Survey of Yugoslav History 19
  • Notes 41
  • 3: Defeating "Greater Serbia," Building Greater Milosevic 47
  • Notes 70
  • 4: Franjo Tudjman's Croatia and the Balkans 75
  • Notes 89
  • 5: Bosnian Muslim Views of National Security 93
  • Notes 110
  • 6: Montenegro: Beyond the Myth 113
  • Notes 131
  • 7: The Balkan Crisis and the Republic of Macedonia 135
  • Notes 150
  • 8: Greece's Policies in the Post-Cold War Balkans 153
  • Conclusions 165
  • 9: Albanian Nationalism and Prospects for Greater Albania 169
  • Notes 190
  • 10: Bulgaria and the Balkans 195
  • Notes 208
  • 11: Turkey and the Balkans: Searching for Stability1 211
  • Conclusion 220
  • Notes 221
  • 12: Romania and the Balkan Imbroglio 225
  • Notes 237
  • 13: Troubles in the Balkans: The View from Hungary 241
  • Notes 255
  • 14: Moscow and the Yugoslav Secession Crisis 257
  • Notes 271
  • 15: US Policy in the Balkans: From Containment to Strategic Reengagement 275
  • Notes 292
  • 16: France, Germany, and the Yugoslavian Wars 297
  • Notes 309
  • 17: Failure in Former Yugoslavia: Hard Lessons for the European Union 311
  • Notes 324
  • 18: NATO and the Bosnian Quagmire: Reluctant Peacemaker 331
  • Notes 347
  • 19: The United Nations and the Conflict in Former Yugoslavia 351
  • Conclusion 367
  • Notes 368
  • About the Editors and Contributors 371
  • Index 381
  • About the Book 390
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