Crises in the Balkans: Views from the Participants

By Constantine P. Danopoulos; Kostas G. Messas | Go to book overview

all of its neighbors, by adopting a foreign policy not of equal distance toward them but one of mutually beneficial cooperation with all of them. Macedonia must not seek to exploit existing differences among the Balkan states, nor must it seek to improve its international position to the expense of its neighbors.

Stability in Macedonia, if achieved on the basis of an "open door" policy toward it neighbors, will be by far the best guarantee of its sovereignty and independence. At the same time, the remaining Balkan countries ought to be encouraged to practice an "open door" policy toward Macedonia through a process of regional cooperation, undertaken in the spirit of further European integration. In this regard, the existing European framework of security, cooperation and integration could be extremely helpful. Although democracy may be slow in coming in Macedonia, it is very encouraging that the country is closer to it than it has ever been before.


Notes
1.
Numerous other studies have discussed developments in the Balkans either within the East-West context or within the context of contemporary trends in the region, both relatively safe approaches. Although these studies have produced important generalizations, they have also resulted in serious oversimplifications, a predicament that could, in part, be avoided by studies combining both approaches. For an example of the first, see Susan L. Woodward, Balkan Tragedy: Chaos and Dissolution After the Cold War ( Washington, D. C.: The Brookings Institution, 1995); for the second, see Sabrina Petra Ramet , Balkan Babel: The Disintegration of Yugoslavia from the Death of Tito to Ethnic War, 2nd ed. ( Boulder: Westview Press, 1996).
2.
Hugh Poulton, Who Are The Macedonians? ( Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1995). p. 4.
3.
Loring M. Danforth, The Macedonian Conflict: Ethnic Nationalism in a Transnational World ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995).
4.
This observation was made by R.V. Burks in his forward to Duncan M. Perry's book, The Politics of Terror. The Macedonian Revolutionary Movement, 1893-1903 ( Durham: Duke University Press, 1988), p. ix.
5.
Ibid., p.40.
6.
Elizabeth Barker, Macedonia: Its Place in Balkan Politics ( London: Royal Institute of International Affairs, 1950), p.17.
7.
For an interesting study concerning Macedonia's Gypsies, see Zoltan Barany, "The Roma in Macedonia: ethnic politics and the marginal condition in a Balkan state," Ethnic and Racial Studies, Vol. 18:3 ( July 1995). For a discussion of ethnic problems in the Macedonian military see Biljana Vankovska-Cvetkovska, "The Trial of Democracy in Macedonia: Ethnic Problems and the Military," Balkan Forum, Vol. 4:3 ( September 1996), pp. 81-105.

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Crises in the Balkans: Views from the Participants
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments ix
  • 1: Ethnonationalism, Security, and Conflict in the Balkans 1
  • Notes 17
  • 2: Of Shatter Belts and Powder Kegs: A Brief Survey of Yugoslav History 19
  • Notes 41
  • 3: Defeating "Greater Serbia," Building Greater Milosevic 47
  • Notes 70
  • 4: Franjo Tudjman's Croatia and the Balkans 75
  • Notes 89
  • 5: Bosnian Muslim Views of National Security 93
  • Notes 110
  • 6: Montenegro: Beyond the Myth 113
  • Notes 131
  • 7: The Balkan Crisis and the Republic of Macedonia 135
  • Notes 150
  • 8: Greece's Policies in the Post-Cold War Balkans 153
  • Conclusions 165
  • 9: Albanian Nationalism and Prospects for Greater Albania 169
  • Notes 190
  • 10: Bulgaria and the Balkans 195
  • Notes 208
  • 11: Turkey and the Balkans: Searching for Stability1 211
  • Conclusion 220
  • Notes 221
  • 12: Romania and the Balkan Imbroglio 225
  • Notes 237
  • 13: Troubles in the Balkans: The View from Hungary 241
  • Notes 255
  • 14: Moscow and the Yugoslav Secession Crisis 257
  • Notes 271
  • 15: US Policy in the Balkans: From Containment to Strategic Reengagement 275
  • Notes 292
  • 16: France, Germany, and the Yugoslavian Wars 297
  • Notes 309
  • 17: Failure in Former Yugoslavia: Hard Lessons for the European Union 311
  • Notes 324
  • 18: NATO and the Bosnian Quagmire: Reluctant Peacemaker 331
  • Notes 347
  • 19: The United Nations and the Conflict in Former Yugoslavia 351
  • Conclusion 367
  • Notes 368
  • About the Editors and Contributors 371
  • Index 381
  • About the Book 390
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