Secrets of Sleep

By Alexander Borbely; Deborah Schneider | Go to book overview

1
A Historical View of Sleep

The world, it seems, does not possess even those of us who are adults completely, but only up to two thirds; one third of us is still quite unborn. Every time we wake in the morning it is like a new birth.

-- SIGMUND FREUD

Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis

When we go to bed at night, we enter an altered state of consciousness that lasts for a number of hours. We cease to see, hear, and feel consciously what occurs around us. The world of sleep and the world of wakefulness are so different that each of us could be said to live in two worlds. The difference appears particularly striking when we wake up suddenly during the night and are not immediately aware of where we are. The French writer Marcel Proust has given a beautiful description of this transitional state:

But for me it was enough if, in my own bed, my sleep was so heavy as completely to relax my consciousness; for then I lost all sense of the place in which I had gone to sleep, and when I awoke at midnight, not knowing where I was, I could not be sure at first of who I was; I had only the most rudimentary sense of existence, such as may lurk and flicker in the

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Secrets of Sleep
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface to the American Edition vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1 - A Historical View of Sleep 3
  • 2 - Scientists Investigate Sleep: The Different Stages of Sleep 16
  • 3 - Sleep: A Theme with Variations 31
  • 4 - Dreams 48
  • 5 - Sleep and Sleeping Pills 70
  • In Conclusion 86
  • 6 - "I Didn't Sleep a Wink All Night": Insomnia and Disorders of Sleeping and Waking 87
  • 7 - Sleep in Animals 105
  • 8 - Sleep and the Brain 122
  • 9 - The Search for Endogenous Sleep Substances 136
  • 10 - Sleep Deprivation 151
  • 11 - Sleep as a Biological Rhythm 170
  • 12 - The Purpose of Sleep 191
  • In Conclusion 204
  • Appendix: - Sleep Disorders Information Leaflet 207
  • Notes 210
  • Bibliography 213
  • Index 223
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.