Aging and skilled performance: Advances in Theory and Applications

By Wendy A. Rogers; Arthur D. Fisk et al. | Go to book overview

presented in this context, we clearly hope that they extend to the study of psychological activities other than skill acquisition and to interventions beyond training, selection, and design.

It also seems appropriate to emphasize what is at least obvious to us. Our focus is on the need to reduce the potential for restrictiveness of phenomena and findings, not on the claim that any current research conducted outside the realm considered practically relevant provides "false" answers or is irrelevant. Current theories may not necessarily be "wrong;" rather, they may be overly limited. Surely it may be true that practically relevant research is less likely, at least initially, to result in the same surface level elegant and "clean" experimental designs that are characteristic of the more traditional approach. However, we are convinced that such research is necessary to expand and supplement our current knowledge of skill and aging in particular and cognitive aging phenomena in general.


REFERENCES

Adams J. A. ( 1972). "Research and the future of engineering psychology". American Psychologist, 27, 615-622.

Anderson J. R. ( 1982). "Acquisition of cognitive skill". Psychological Review, 89, 369-406.

Birmingham H. P., & Taylor F. V. ( 1954). "A design philosophy for man-machine control systems". Proceedings of the I.R.E., 42( 12), 1748-1758.

Chapanis A. ( 1988). "Some generalizations about generalization". Human Factors, 30, 253-267.

Cook T. D., & Campbell D. T. ( 1979) Quasi-experimentation: Design and analysis issues for field settings. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Craik F. I. M., & McDowd J. ( 1987). "Age differences in recall and recognition". Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 13, 474-479.

Crossman E. R. ( 1956). "Perceptual activity in manual work". Research, 9, 42-49.

Drury C. G., Paramore B., Van H. P. Cott, Grey S. M., & Corlett E. N. ( 1987). "Task analysis". In G. Salvendy (Ed.), Handbook of human factors (pp. 370-401). New York: Wiley.

Eggemeier F. T., & Fisk A. D. ( 1992). "Automatic information processing and high performance skills". (AL-TR-1992-0134). Wright-Patterson AFB, OH: Armstrong Laboratory, Logistics Research Division.

Ericsson K. A., Krampe R. T., & Tesch-Römer C. ( 1993). "The role of deliberate practice in the acquisition of expert performance". Psychological Review, 100, 363-406.

Fisher D. L. ( 1993). "Optimal performance engineering: Good, better, best". Human Factors, 35, 115-139.

Gibson E. J. ( 1965). "Learning to read". Science, 148, 1066-1072.

Gigerenzer G., Swijtink Z., Porter T., Datson L., Beatty J., & Kruger L. ( 1989). The empire of chance. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press.

Hammond K. R. ( 1966). The psychology of Egon Brunswik. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Wilson.

"Inside the south". ( 1994, September 12). Sports Illustrated, 58.

-14-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Aging and skilled performance: Advances in Theory and Applications
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 284

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.