Renaissance Philosophy

By Charles B. Schmitt; Brian P. Copenhaver | Go to book overview

OPUS General Editors
Christopher Butler Robert Evans John SkorupskiOPUS books provide concise, original, and authoritative introductions to a wide range of subjects in the humanities and sciences. They are written by experts for the general reader as well as for students.
A History of Western Philosophy
This series of OPUS books offers a comprehensive and up-to-date survey of the history of philosophical ideas from earliest times. Its aim is not only to set those ideas in their immediate cultural context, but also to focus on their value and relevance to twentieth-century thinking.
Classical Thought Terence Irwin
Medieval Philosophy David Luscombe
Renaissance Philosophy C. B. Schmitt and Brian Copenhaver
The Rationalists John Cottingham
The Empiricists R. S. Woolhouse
Engligh-Language Philosophy 1750-1945 John Skorupski
Continental Philosophy since 1750 Robert C. Solomon
English-Language Philosophy since 1945 Thomas Baldwin (forthcoming)

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Renaissance Philosophy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Opus General Editors ii
  • Title Page iii
  • P. O. Kristeller v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • 1 - The Historical Context of Renaissance Philosophy 1
  • 2 - Aristotelianism 60
  • 3 - Platonism 127
  • 4 - Stoics, Sceptics, Epicureans, and Other Innovators 196
  • 5 - Nature against Authority: Breaking Away from the Classics 285
  • 6 - Renaissance Philosophy and Modern Memory 329
  • Bibliography 358
  • Index 433
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