Edith Wharton's Letters from the Underworld: Fictions of Women and Writing

By Candace Waid | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Anyone who works on Edith Wharton is in the debt of R. W. B. Lewis. Throughout the research and writing of this book, I had the good fortune to benefit not only from his scholarship and critical example but also from his guidance and support. This book would not have been begun or completed without the early and continuing encouragement of Jean-Christophe Agnew. My friends and colleagues Jennifer Wicke, Margaret Ferguson, Alan Trachtenberg, and Patricia Meyer Spacks also read versions of these chapters, offering valuable criticism and providing a community in which to write. I am also grateful to Harriet Chessman and Brigitte Peucker for participating in the intellectual and personal dialogue that this book represents. To Allen Tullos, who has been a reader for many years, I owe my introduction to the life of the mind and a debt of spirit and imagination.

Others who offered essential encouragement, support, and education include: Virginia Praytor, David Lowe, Miriam Hansen, Susan Allein, Harriet Swift, Phil Teague, Ellen Dawson Sutton, Norton Batkin, Paul Fry, Richard Brodhead, Laura Kalman, Jean Edmunds, Dorothy Tullos, Rolf Tullos, Augusta Harper Cunningham, Andrea Kaufman, Elizabeth Sicelof, Rhoda McGraw, Robert Yuran, Alice Parker, Helene Marshall, Arthur Marshall, Leslie Agnew, Thelma Levine, Elizabeth Meese, Judy Babbitts, Susan Smulyan, Lee Howard, George Lord, and Rose Gladney.

I would like to thank Bill Murray, Dawn Murray, and Will Murray, for their special efforts on my behalf. Pat Saik, Kathleen Bagley Tanner, and Sue Bullard offered important encouragement. I thank Harriet Jones, Donald Waid, Billie Waid, Allen Tullos, and Donna Waid Murray for sharing the will to narrate. For standing with me among what Wharton thought of as the pots and pans of language, I thank David Marshall, who has been the other voice in a dialogue that shaped the argument of this book. His dedication and inspiration have made the book possible.

In its early stages this project was supported by a fellowship from the American Association of University Women. A fellowship from the Georges

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Edith Wharton's Letters from the Underworld: Fictions of Women and Writing
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 237

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.