Composition of Scientific Words: A Manual of Methods and a Lexicon of Materials for the Practice of Logotechnics

By Roland Wilbur Brown | Go to book overview

CROSS-REFERENCE LEXICON

A
a- < AS. an, on, at, in, upon, see on; < AS. a, af, of, of, off, from, out, see froma-; ab- < L. ab, from, off, away, see from; < L. ad, to, see toa-; an- < Gr. a, an, not, without, negative, privative, see not; < Gr. a-, with, union, sameness, copulative, see withaages, Gr. unbroken, hard, strong; see hardaaptos, Gr. invincible; see strongaatos, Gr. insatiable; see hungerab- < L. ab, from, away, see from; < L. ad, to, see toabaco- < Gr. abakes, speechless, childlike, innocent; see silentabactus, L. driven away, aborted; abactor, driver off; see ago under driveabacus; abax,-acis, L. (Gr. -akos), board, counting-board, gaming-board divided into square compartments; abaculus, dim. small, colored tile for inlay and mosaic work; see numberabandon < OF. abandoner.
L. abdico, -atus, disown, renounce, resign: abdicate, abdication.
L. abjicio, -jectus, cast off, give up; see poor
L. abjuro, -atus; ejuro, forswear, reject, abandon: abjure, ejurate.
Gr. ametor, -os, motherless; see alone
Gr. apostasis, f. defection, departure from; apostates, m. runaway, deserter, renegade; apostatikos, of desertion, rebellious: apostasy, apostate, Apostates albiclathratus (a moth), Psilodacus apostata (a fly).
Gr. automolos, m. deserter:
Gr. brephotropheion, foundling or orphan asylum; see house
L. cedo, cessus, go, yield, abandon, withdraw; concedo, give up; discedo, part, leave, forsake; see move
Gr. cheroö, bereave, desolate; cherosis; cherosyne, bereavement; see chera under woman
L. deficio, -fectus, desert, leave: defection.
L. desero, -ertus, abandon, forsake, leave: deserted, Deserta raptoria (a bug).
L. desisto, -stitches, cease, leave off: desist.
L. desolo. -atus, leave alone, abandon, forsake: desolate, desolation.
L. destituo, -utus, desert, forsake: destitute, destitution.
L. deviator, -is, m. one who leaves the way, forsaker: deviator.
L. digredior,-essus, abandon, deviate from: digress, digression.
L. dimitto, -issus, abandon, forsake: dimission, dimissary.
Gr. ekdysis, a getting out, escape, molt, < ekdyo, take off, strip, lay bare; see bare
L. exul, outcast, exile; exilium, outcast; see banish
Gr. leipo, leave, be wanting or without; leimma, -los; leipsanon, n. remnant, relic; loipos, remaining; ekleipsis, f. a forsaking; eklipes, failing, deficient; L. ellipsis (Gr. elleipsis), f. omission, < elleipo, leave out, omit: lipopod, lipogram, Lipalian, eclipse, ecliptic, ellipse, ellipsis, Lipodectes penetrans (a Paleocene mammal), Liposarcus multiradiatus (a fish), Lipura hudsonia (a marmot).
L. linquo, lictus, leave, abandon, lack; derelictus, abandoned, deserted, disregarded, neglected; relictus, abandoned, forsaken; reliquia, f. leaving, remnant; reliquum, n. remainder, balance: delinquent, derelict, relic, relinquish, reliquary, Dorcus derelictus (a beetle).
Gr. loisthos, left behind; see after
L. orbo. -atus, bereave; orbus, bereft of parents; orba, orphan; see alone
L. orphanus (Gr. orphanos), bereft; see alone
L. procrastino, -atus, put off till tomorrow, defer; see delay
Gr. prodotes, betrayer, traitor; prodotos, abandoned; see prodosia under treason
L. residuuss, remaining, left over: residue, residuary, residuum.
L. resigno,-atus, cancel, give up, surrender, relinquish: resign, resignation.
L. subduco, -uctus, evacuate, remove, withdraw: subduce, subduction.
L. vidua, widow; see woman
See: depart, let, run, shun, free, give, alone, end, empty, delay, from, bad, lose, cancel

abate < OF. abatre; see lessen

abatos, Gr. untrodden, inviolate, pure, chaste; see pure

-62-

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Composition of Scientific Words: A Manual of Methods and a Lexicon of Materials for the Practice of Logotechnics
Table of contents

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  • Title Page *
  • Contents 1
  • Foreword 3
  • Introduction 7
  • CROSS-REFERENCE LEXICON 62
  • Bibliography 877
  • Index 881
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