The Black Doctor: And Other Tales of Terror and Mystery

By A. Conan Doyle | Go to book overview

X
THE JAPANNED BOX

IT was a curious thing, said the private tutor; one of those grotesque and whimsical incidents which occur to one as one goes through life. I lost the best situation which I am ever likely to have through it. But I am glad that I went to Thorpe Place, for I gained --well, as I tell you the story you will learn what I gained.

I don't know whether you are familiar with that part of the Midlands which is drained by the Avon. It is the most English part of England. Shakespeare, the flower of the whole race, was born right in the middle of it. It is a land of rolling pastures, rising in higher folds to the westward, until they swell into the Malvern Hills. There are no towns, but numerous villages, each with its grey Norman church. You have left the brick of the southern and eastern counties behind you, and everything is stone--stone for the walls, and lichened slabs of stone for the roofs. It is all grim and solid and massive, as befits the heart of a great nation.

It was in the middle of this country, not very far from Evesham, that Sir John Bollamore lived in the old ancestral home of Thorpe Place, and thither it was that I came to teach his two little sons. Sir John was a widower--his wife had died three years before-- and he had been left with these two lads aged eight and ten, and one dear little girl of seven. Miss Witherton, who is now my wife, was governess to this little girl. I was tutor to the two boys. Could there

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The Black Doctor: And Other Tales of Terror and Mystery
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tales of Terror 7
  • I - The Horror of the Heights 9
  • II - The Leather Funnel 31
  • III - The New Catacomb 47
  • IV - The Case of Lady Sannox 66
  • V - The Terror of Blue John Gap 80
  • VI - The Brazilian Cat 103
  • Tales of Mystery 131
  • VII - The Lost Special 133
  • VIII - The Beetle-Hunter 157
  • IX - The Man with the Watches 179
  • X - The Japanned Box 202
  • XI - The Black Doctor 219
  • XII - The Jew's Breastplate 244
  • XIII - The Nightmare Room 270
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