The Black Doctor: And Other Tales of Terror and Mystery

By A. Conan Doyle | Go to book overview

XIII
THE NIGHTMARE ROOM

THE sitting-room of the Masons was a very singular apartment. At one end it was furnished with considerable luxury. The deep sofas, the low, luxurious chairs, the voluptuous statuettes, and the rich curtains hanging from deep and ornamental screens of metal- work made a fitting frame for the lovely woman who was the mistress of the establishment. Mason, a young but wealthy man of affairs, had clearly spared no pains and no expense to meet every want and every whim of his beautiful wife. It was natural that he should do so, for she had given up much for his sake. The most famous dancer in France, the heroine of a dozen extraordinary romances, she had resigned her life of glittering pleasure in order to share the fate of the young American, whose austere ways differed so widely from her own. In all that wealth could buy he tried to make amends for what she had lost. Some might perhaps have thought it in better taste had he not proclaimed this fact--had he not even allowed it to be printed--but save for some personal peculiarities of the sort, his conduct was that of a husband who has never for an instant ceased to be a lover. Even the presence of spectators would not prevent the public exhibition of his overpowering affection.

But the room was singular. At first it seemed familiar, and yet a longer acquaintance made one realise its sinister peculiarities. It was silent--very silent. No footfall could be heard upon those rich carpets

-270-

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The Black Doctor: And Other Tales of Terror and Mystery
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Tales of Terror 7
  • I - The Horror of the Heights 9
  • II - The Leather Funnel 31
  • III - The New Catacomb 47
  • IV - The Case of Lady Sannox 66
  • V - The Terror of Blue John Gap 80
  • VI - The Brazilian Cat 103
  • Tales of Mystery 131
  • VII - The Lost Special 133
  • VIII - The Beetle-Hunter 157
  • IX - The Man with the Watches 179
  • X - The Japanned Box 202
  • XI - The Black Doctor 219
  • XII - The Jew's Breastplate 244
  • XIII - The Nightmare Room 270
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