Preface

Sceno-Graphic Techniques is the compilation of graphic solutions used in the various stages of planning and executing a setting for the theatre. It seeks to bring together for the special use of the scene designer and stage technician drafting techniques, selected portions of descriptive geometry, pattern making or developments from engineering drawing, and the graphics of perspective. Although the manual is conceived as a basic text for the scene designer, it is aimed toward professional levels of drafting and problem solving.

Part One, "The Language of Lines," is concerned with the graphic presentation portion of stage design. It is the study of drafting techniques, conventions, and symbols exceptional to the theatre. Part Two, "Graphic Solutions," deals with the graphic problem solving often needed to draw and make the frequent irregular forms of present-day scene design. Part Three, "Perspective in the Theatre," involves the two forms of perspective: 1) the two-dimensional perspective found in the designer's sketch or representation of a scenic form; 2) the three-dimensional perspective associated with a theatrical illusion or stylistic concept. The first, though used in the theatre to present the designs for a setting, is also found in other disciplines such as architecture and interior design. The second, purely theatrical in origin, examines the graphics of baroque perspective as well as presentday uses.

Grateful acknowledgment is made to Russell McCracken for his assistance in preparing the original text and to Donald Oenslager for his suggestions and illustrative material. Many thanks for their helpful cooperation to Jean and William Eckart, Ned Bowman of Scenographic Media, Willie Hart of T. B. McDonald Construction Company, and to Noel Stanton, technical director, English National Opera, London.

A special thanks for the most helpful and cooperative staff of the Library and Museum of the Performing Arts, Lincoln Center; Beineke Rare Book and Manuscript Library and Yale Theatrical Print Collection, Yale University, in aiding the research of "Perspective in the Theatre."

Sceno-Graphic Techniques was conceived in 1957 at Yale Drama School as a classroom drafting manual. It was the first attempt to organize the drafting techniques of the theatre. In 1964 at Carnegie- Mellon University it was revised and expanded to include part two, "Graphic

-vii-

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Sceno-Graphic Techniques
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Part One - The Language of Lines 1
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - Tooling Up 5
  • 3 - Viewpoint 11
  • 4 - Thick And Thin of It 16
  • 5 - Inside Story 20
  • 6 - Feet And Inches 24
  • 7 - Another Angle 32
  • 8 - Pictorials 38
  • 9 - Floor Plans 45
  • 10 - Elevations 57
  • Part Two - Graphic Solutions 71
  • 11 - Space Patterns 73
  • 12 - Surfaces 74
  • 13 - True Length And Shape 80
  • 14 - Examples 88
  • 15 - Problems 92
  • Part Three - Perspective in the Theatre 99
  • 16 - Two- Dimensional Perspective 101
  • 17 - The Graphics Of Two- Dimensional Perspective 106
  • 18 - Perspective Floor Grid And Designer's Sketch 112
  • 19 - Three- Dimensional Perspective 123
  • 20 - Three- Dimensional Foreshortening 138
  • 21 - Extreme Viewpoints 142
  • 22 - Problems 147
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