21
Extreme Viewpoints

Three-point Perspective

On the following pages are examples of perspective from unusual viewpoints. When the observation point is too close, too high, or too low, the original assumption that all verticals are perpendicular to the ground is no longer valid. We know that when we stand at the base of a tall building and look up, the vertical lines seem to converge. The opposite effect is experienced when looking down from a window of an upper floor. The verticals are converging to a third vanishing point above or below the horizon line.


Slanted Picture Plane

A graphic explanation of three-point perspective entails the use of a slanted picture plane. A professional photographer corrects converging vertical lines by using a swing front or PC lens (perspective correction). The lens tilts forward until parallel with the object, thereby correcting the image that falls on the negative. This is essentially what the graphics of perspective does to keep vertical lines perpendicular. It follows that if we want to find the convergence of a given situation, we tilt the picture frame forward to an angle approximately perpendicular to the center line of the cone of vision. If the situation is reversed, a high angle of vision, the picture plane is tilted back.

The slanted picture plane serves as an explanation of three-point perspective; however, the designer should feel free to vary the angle for design reasons. Many times a vertical, or third vanishing point, can be arbitrarily established in relation to right and left vanishing points to create an object or group of objects with a convergence that is right for the composition.

-142-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sceno-Graphic Techniques
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Part One - The Language of Lines 1
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - Tooling Up 5
  • 3 - Viewpoint 11
  • 4 - Thick And Thin of It 16
  • 5 - Inside Story 20
  • 6 - Feet And Inches 24
  • 7 - Another Angle 32
  • 8 - Pictorials 38
  • 9 - Floor Plans 45
  • 10 - Elevations 57
  • Part Two - Graphic Solutions 71
  • 11 - Space Patterns 73
  • 12 - Surfaces 74
  • 13 - True Length And Shape 80
  • 14 - Examples 88
  • 15 - Problems 92
  • Part Three - Perspective in the Theatre 99
  • 16 - Two- Dimensional Perspective 101
  • 17 - The Graphics Of Two- Dimensional Perspective 106
  • 18 - Perspective Floor Grid And Designer's Sketch 112
  • 19 - Three- Dimensional Perspective 123
  • 20 - Three- Dimensional Foreshortening 138
  • 21 - Extreme Viewpoints 142
  • 22 - Problems 147
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 150

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.