A History of Danish Literature

By P. M. Mitchell; Mogens Haugsted | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
Humanism, Reformation, and Renaissance

The break with the late medieval culture, its clericalism, its scholasticism, and its traditionalism, came quickly in Denmark. While in Europe to the south the classical revival which was a substantial part of the new movement in learning that we call Renaissance Humanism made itself felt from the fourteenth century onward--first in Italy, then in Germany, the Netherlands, England, and France--it was not until well into the sixteenth century that Humanism became established in Denmark. And when Humanism came to Denmark, it did not come alone. It was very nearly one with the Reformation, which it had fostered elsewhere in Europe. What is more, both Humanists and Reformers took into their services the new art of printing.

While Humanism strengthened and renewed a knowledge of the literature of classical antiquity and aroused a new interest in literature and history, the Reformation effected a new and general use of the vernacular. Consequently, the twenties of the sixteenth century in Denmark may be looked upon as a turning point not only in ecclesiastical and political history, but also in cultural and specifically literary history. From the standpoint of belles-lettres, the Reformation marks above all the use of literary media directed at large segments of population.

Despite the political exigencies of the times and before the impact of Humanism, there had been an increase both in learning and in the use of the vernacular during the fifteenth century. After a false start, the University of Copenhagen had been founded in 1479 under the aegis of the Church and the influence of German scholasticism. Many Danish students attended German universities both before and after the founding of the Danish university. The number of pupils attending church schools increased.

Aside from the vernacular literature (which was discussed in the foregoing chapter), prayers and hymns began to be translated into Danish. The translations were probably made for practical rather than ideological reasons, but they bespeak a growing desire to give the vernacular some of the dignity which the ecclesiastical language had hitherto enjoyed almost alone.

-48-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A History of Danish Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 324

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.